Traditional strength training vs jump training for physically inactive young adults

June 30, 2020

The study focuses on the effects of Traditional Resistance Training (TRT) and Plyometric Jump Training (PJT) in participants who are sedentary and physically inactive in sports. The aim was to find out important practical applications that can help improve trainings and physical fitness.

The researchers studied the effects of four weeks of Traditional Resistance Training (TRT) versus Plyometric Jump Training (PJT) programs on the muscular fitness of sedentary and physically inactive participants. Baseline and follow-up tests set in the research included the assessment of Squat Jump, Countermovement Jump, elastic index, and maximal strength of the knee extensors. The participants comprised of both males and females with ages between 18 to 29 years. They were randomly assorted into a control group of 11 people, TRT group with 8, and PJT group having 9 participants. The TRT program emphasized slow-speed movements with free weights. The PJT program focused on high-speed jump movements without external loads. Both TRT and PJT sessions were 30-minutes in duration.

The result showed no significant difference, hence it was concluded that in healthy participants who are both physically inactive and sedentary, the routines of Traditional Resistance Training (TRT) and Plyometric Jump Training (PJT) are equally effective in improving the muscular fitness.
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Read the open access article here: https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOSSJ-13-12

Bentham Science Publishers

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