Is drinking more coffee associated with lower risk of death?

July 02, 2018

BottomLine: Coffee is popular around the globe and studies have generally reported inverse associations (moving in opposite directions) between its consumption and the risk of chronic diseases and death. But what about heavy coffee drinking and people with genetic variations that can affect how they metabolize caffeine? A new study of nearly half a million people in the United Kingdom suggests a lower risk of death was associated with drinking more coffee, including among coffee drinkers who have eight or more cups per day, in both slow and fast metabolizers of caffeine, and in drinkers of ground, instant and decaffeinated coffee. The results come with a warning to interpret them with caution because they are based on observational data and cannot prove causation.

Authors: Erikka Loftfield, Ph.D., of the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, and coauthors.
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To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2425)

Editor's Note: The article contains funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

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JAMA Internal Medicine

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