Prefrontal cortex stimulation reduces aggressive intentions

July 02, 2018

Increasing prefrontal cortex activity with brain stimulation reduces aggressive intent in human adults, according to new research published in JNeurosci. This finding extends previous correlational aggression research by demonstrating the influence of the prefrontal cortex on the intent to commit an aggressive act in a "gold standard" double-blind, placebo-controlled, stratified, parallel-group, randomized trial.

Olivia Choy and colleagues randomly assigned adults to a treatment group that received transcranial direct current stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or a control group that received a placebo intervention. Participants in the treatment group showed less intention to commit hypothetical physical or sexual assault and perceived these acts as morally wrong more so than individuals in the control group. Enhanced moral judgement partly accounted for reduced intent to commit sexual, but not physical, assault.

These results suggest that using brain stimulation to reduce an individual's intention to commit an aggressive act may be a first step towards creating behavior change in individuals susceptible to violent behavior. Further research is needed to determine whether violence could actually be prevented by prefrontal upregulation.
-end-
Article: Stimulation of the Prefrontal Cortex Reduces Intentions to Commit Aggression: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Stratified, Parallel-Group Trial
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3317-17.2018
Corresponding author: Olivia Choy (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore), oliviachoy@ntu.edu.sg

About JNeurosci

JNeurosci, the Society for Neuroscience's first journal, was launched in 1981 as a means to communicate the findings of the highest quality neuroscience research to the growing field. Today, the journal remains committed to publishing cutting-edge neuroscience that will have an immediate and lasting scientific impact, while responding to authors' changing publishing needs, representing breadth of the field and diversity in authorship.

About The Society for Neuroscience

The Society for Neuroscience is the world's largest organization of scientists and physicians devoted to understanding the brain and nervous system. The nonprofit organization, founded in 1969, now has nearly 37,000 members in more than 90 countries and over 130 chapters worldwide.

Society for Neuroscience

Related Brain Stimulation Articles from Brightsurf:

MUSC researchers test brain stimulation in zero gravity
How does zero gravity affect astronauts' brains? MUSC scientists took to the skies as they try to figure that out.

Brain stimulation reduces dyslexia deficits
Restoring normal patterns of rhythmic neural activity through non-invasive electrical stimulation of the brain alleviates sound-processing deficits and improves reading accuracy in adults with dyslexia, according to a study published September 8, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Silvia Marchesotti and Anne-Lise Giraud of the University of Geneva, and colleagues.

Does deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's increase risk of dementia?
There's good news for people with Parkinson's disease. A new study shows that deep brain stimulation may not increase the risk of developing dementia.

Why doesn't deep-brain stimulation work for everyone?
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have mapped nine functional networks in the deep-brain structures of 10 healthy people, an accomplishment that could lead to improvements in deep-brain stimulation therapy for severe cases of Parkinson's disease and other neurological conditions.

Beware of swimming if you use deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's
Researchers have identified nine cases of people who lost their ability to swim after having a deep brain stimulation device implanted to control symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

Enhancing memory network via brain stimulation
Magnetic stimulation of the posterior parietal cortex increases functional connectivity of a neural network implicated in memory, shows human research published in eNeuro.

How can ultrasonic brain stimulation cure brain diseases?
IBS scientists found a calcium channel expressed in astrocytes in the brain to be a highly sensitive target for LILFU-induced neuronal activity in the motor cortex, such as tail movement.

Deep brain stimulation for refractory severe tinnitus
Researchers investigated the safety and efficacy of deep brain stimulation in the treatment of refractory severe tinnitus in a small group of patients.

Take a break! Brain stimulation improves motor learning
In a joint study, Jost-Julian Rumpf from the University of Leipzig and Gesa Hartwigsen from MPI CBS suggest the process of motor learning probably already begins during short interruptions of practice.

Brain stimulation for PTSD patients
University of Houston assistant professor of electrical engineering Rose T.

Read More: Brain Stimulation News and Brain Stimulation Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.