Nav: Home

Arts and medicine: clarifying history, lessons for today from Peter Neubauer's twins study

July 02, 2019

Bottomline: This Arts and Medicine feature reviews "Three Identical Strangers" and "The Twinning Reaction," two documentaries telling the story of identical twins and triplets adopted as infants into separate families who were unknowing participants in a two-decade nature vs. nurture study of child development beginning in 1960.
-end-
(doi:10.1001/jama.2019.8152)

Editor's Note:  Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Media advisory: The full article is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2737146?guestAccessKey=673df033-283a-4052-abf0-19f229d67d8e&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=070219

JAMA

Related Infants Articles:

Premature infants at greater risk of SIDS
Premature infants still have a greater risk compared to full-term babies of dying of SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths despite recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics that hospital NICU's provide more safe infant sleep education to parents before they go home.
Detecting autism in infants before symptoms emerge
According to the results of a new study, a brain scan can detect functional changes in babies as young as six months of age that predicts later diagnosis with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
Rotavirus vaccination in infants and young children
Rotaviruses (RV) are the commonest cause of diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide.
A mother's voice may help stabilize preterm infants
A recent review of published research indicates that hearing their mother's voice can benefit the health of preterm infants.
Healthy weight gain in infants
With nearly 10 percent of infants considered 'high weight for length,' University of Delaware researcher Jillian Trabulsi wants to help babies achieve a healthy weight starting with their first months of life.
Mothers and infants connect through song
Research from UM Frost School of Music provides insight into the importance of song for infants and mothers.
Infants use prefrontal cortex in learning
A group of 8-month-olds has provided evidence that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the prefrontal cortex contributes to learning during infancy.
Very premature infants: Towards better care
Born too soon, very premature infants are particularly vulnerable and need appropriate care.
Maternal vaccination again influenza associated with protection for infants
How long does the protection from a mother's immunization against influenza during pregnancy last for infants after they are born?
Infants much less likely to get the flu if moms are vaccinated while pregnant
Babies whose moms were vaccinated against the flu while pregnant had a 70 percent reduction in confirmed flu cases compared with infants whose moms weren't immunized, study finds.

Related Infants Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#532 A Class Conversation
This week we take a look at the sociology of class. What factors create and impact class? How do we try and study it? How does class play out differently in different countries like the US and the UK? How does it impact the political system? We talk with Daniel Laurison, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Swarthmore College and coauthor of the book "The Class Ceiling: Why it Pays to be Privileged", about class and its impacts on people and our systems.