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Risk of ischemic stroke in patients with COVID-19 compared with influenza

July 02, 2020

What The Study Did: This observational study compares the rate of ischemic stroke among patients with COVID-19 compared with influenza in two New York hospitals.

Authors: Babak B. Navi, M.D., M.S., of Weill Cornell Medicine in New York, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2020.2730)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflicts of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflicts of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.
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Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaneurol.2020.2730?guestAccessKey=b6efbdea-8389-4158-8c92-b734ad3845eb&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=070220

JAMA Neurology

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