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Evolution of loss of smell or taste in COVID-19

July 02, 2020

What The Study Did: This survey-based study examines the clinical course of the loss of sense of smell and taste in a case series of mildly symptomatic patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Authors: Daniele Borsetto, M.D., of Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals in London, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2020.1379)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflicts of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

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Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaoto.2020.1379?guestAccessKey=2e0cf7c3-ca46-47d9-902b-1f97e228e6be&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=070220
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JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery

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