Weight loss likely gain from exercise study

July 03, 2002

EXERCISING at particular times in the menstrual cycle could help women to lose more weight.

That's one of the initial discoveries made by University of Adelaide PhD student Leanne Redman, who is studying the little-known impact of the menstrual cycle on women's exercise.

Early results of her research show that exercising at the later menstrual phase could burn more fat and help women to feel less tired.

"Results suggest that exercise performance is improved during the later part of the menstrual cycle-that is, when circulating concentrations of ovarian hormones (oestrogen and progesterone) are high," she says.

At the later menstrual phase, the hormones promote the use of fats as an energy source to support exercise. The use of fat in aerobic activity provides a more efficient delivery of energy, and results in fewer waste products being produced. These waste products normally contribute to fatigue.

Ms Redman's findings are of international interest to sport scientists and physicians involved in prescribing exercise programs to women for sport, fitness or health.

"According to our research, there would be clear benefits to women if their weight management programs, as well as providing a sound diet and lifestyle, took into account the physiological changes that occur during the menstrual cycle," she says.

Ms Redman is currently seeking women between the ages of 18-30 to volunteer for the last phase of her study.

This phase will look at the impact of synthetic hormones within the oral contraceptive pill on women's metabolism and exercise capacity.

The participants must be: non-smokers, already taking an oral contraceptive pill, exercise at least once a week, and from the Adelaide metropolitan area.
-end-
For more information, potential volunteers should contact Leanne Redman by calling +61 8 8303 4569, or they can send her an email: leanne.redman@adelaide.edu.au

MEDIA CONTACT:

Leanne Redman, PhD student, Department of Physiology and Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, and Project Manager, Exercise Physiology Laboratory: phone +61 8 8303 4569 work, email leanne.redman@adelaide.edu.au

University of Adelaide

Related Weight Articles from Brightsurf:

How much postmenopause weight gain can be blamed on weight-promoting medications?
Abdominal weight gain, which is common during the postmenopause period, is associated with an array of health problems, including diabetes and heart disease.

Commercial weight management groups could support women to manage their weight after giving birth
Women who were overweight at the start of their pregnancy would welcome support after they have given birth in the form of commercial weight management groups, University of Warwick-led research has found.

Rollercoaster weight changes can repeat with second pregnancy, especially among normal-weight women
Everyone knows that gaining excess weight during one pregnancy is bad, but clinicians rarely consider weight gains and losses from one pregnancy to the next -- especially in normal-weight women.

Early and ongoing experiences of weight stigma linked to self-directed weight shaming
In a new study published today in Obesity Science and Practice, researchers at Penn Medicine and the University of Connecticut Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity surveyed more than 18,000 adults enrolled in the commercial weight management program WW International, and found that participants who internalized weight bias the most tended to be younger, female, have a higher body mass index (BMI), and have an earlier onset of their weight struggle

Being teased about weight linked to more weight gain among children, NIH study suggests
Youth who said they were teased or ridiculed about their weight increased their body mass by 33 percent more each year, compared to a similar group who had not been teased, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

Association between weight before pregnancy, weight gain during pregnancy and adverse outcomes for mother, infant
An analysis that combined the results of 25 studies including nearly 197,000 women suggests prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) of the mother was more strongly associated with risk of adverse maternal and infant outcomes than the amount of gestational weight gain.

Study: Faster weight loss no better than slow weight loss for health benefits
Losing weight slowly or quickly won't tip the scale in your favor when it comes to overall health, according to new research.

What your choice of clothing says about your weight
It's commonly said that you can tell a great deal about a person by the clothes they wear.

Stand up -- it could help you lose weight
You might want to read this on your feet. A new study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology found that standing instead of sitting for six hours a day could prevent weight gain and help people to actually lose weight.

Cash for weight loss
A new study, published in the journal Social Science and Medicine, has shown that selling rewards programmes to participants entering a weight loss programme is a low cost strategy to increase both the magnitude and duration of weight loss.

Read More: Weight News and Weight Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.