Children's health and human rights are at risk in Nepal

July 03, 2006

"Time is running out for the children of Nepal," say Sonal Singh (Johns Hopkins University) and colleagues in an Essay in PLoS Medicine. Nepalese children, they say, "face an uncertain future if their health and human rights concerns are not addressed by local governments, nongovernmental organizations, and the international community in a timely manner."

One out of every 11 children in Nepal dies before reaching the age of five, and almost 70,000 children die yearly from preventable causes. The ongoing violent conflict in Nepal between Maoist rebels and government forces has disrupted the delivery of health care to children and deprived them of education. And since the end of the cease fire in 2003, say Singh and colleagues, there has been a steady increase in human rights violations against Nepalese children by both parties to the conflict.

The international community, they say, needs to raise its voice against the atrocities levied against children by both conflicting parties. "It needs to provide enough resources to meet the basic needs of the children and support developmental programs, but ensure that foreign support does not fund military exercises or increase child health violations, in order to prevent the children of Nepal from becoming another 'lost generation.'"
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All works published in PLoS Medicine are open access. Everything is immediately available without cost to anyone, anywhere--to read, download, redistribute, include in databases, and otherwise use--subject only to the condition that the original authorship is properly attributed. Copyright is retained by the authors. The Public Library of Science uses the Creative Commons Attribution License.

Citation: Singh S, Bøhler E, Dahal K, Mills E (2006) The state of child health and human rights in Nepal. PLoS Med 3(7): e203.

PLEASE ADD THE LINK TO THE PUBLISHED ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0030203

PRESS-ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/plme-03-07-singh.pdf

CONTACT:
Sonal Singh
Wake Forest University
General Internal Medicine
1 Medical Centre Boulevard
Winstom Salem, NC 27157-1052 United States of America
+1-336-716-8203
+1-585-716-7359 (fax)
sosingh@wfubmc.edu

About PLoS Medicine
PLoS Medicine is an open access, freely available international medical journal. It publishes original research that enhances our understanding of human health and disease, together with commentary and analysis of important global health issues. For more information, visit http://www.plosmedicine.org

PLOS

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