Nanomedicine in the fight against thrombotic diseases

July 03, 2015

Future Science Group (FSG) today announced the publication of a new article in Future Science OA, covering the use of nanocarriers and microbubbles in drug delivery for thrombotic disease.

Ischemic heart disease and stroke caused by thrombus formation are responsible for more than 17 million deaths per year worldwide. Molecules with thrombolytic capacities have been developed and some of them are in clinical practice. However, some patients treated with these molecules develop lethal intracranial hemorrhages. Furthermore, these molecules are rapidly degraded in the blood stream, and therefore large amounts of drugs are needed to be efficacious.

Research has focused on protecting thrombolytic molecules and enhancing their accumulation in clots. In this context, nanoparticles are interesting tools as the drugs can be loaded onto them and are thus protected from degradation in the body. Moreover, thrombus-targeting peptides have been used to concentrate the nanoparticles loaded with thrombolytic molecules into the thrombus.

"With millions of deaths per year resulting from thrombosis, it is important to improve drug delivery and the subsequent outcomes," commented Francesca Lake, Managing Editor. "This review provides an excellent overview of where we stand thus far with utilizing nanoscale technology to solve this issue."

Didier Letourneur (CNRS, France), author of the piece and member of the Editorial Board of Future Science OA, clarified: "This review outlines the preclinical research as well as the clinical trials made in this field. In spite of the encouraging results, more in-depth development is necessary to overcome the limits linked to thrombus deep localization, specific targeting of the clot and a rapid release of the drugs from safe nanoparticles."

The review is available free to read, here: http://www.future-science.com/doi/full/10.4155/fso.15.46
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About Future Science OA

Launched in March 2015, Future Science OA is the inaugural gold open access journal from Future Science Group. It publishes articles covering research of application to human health, and utilizes a CC-BY license. Future Science OA embraces the importance of publishing all good-quality research with the potential to further the progress of medical science. Negative and early-phase research will be considered. The journal also features review articles, editorials and perspectives, providing readers with a leading source of commentary and analysis.

About Future Science Group

Founded in 2001, Future Science Group (FSG) is a progressive publisher focused on breakthrough medical, biotechnological, and scientific research. FSG's portfolio includes two imprints, Future Science and Future Medicine. In addition to this core publishing business, FSG develops specialist eCommunities. Key titles and sites include Bioanalysis Zone, Epigenomics, Nanomedicine and the award-winning Regenerative Medicine.

The aim of FSG is to service the advancement of clinical practice and drug research by enhancing the efficiency of communications among clinicians, researchers and decision-makers, and by providing innovative solutions to their information needs. This is achieved through a customer-centric approach, use of new technologies, products that deliver value-for-money and uncompromisingly high standards. http://www.futuresciencegroup.com

Future Science Group

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