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Jefferson Lab director awarded Glazebrook Medal

July 05, 2016

The director of the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and president of Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, Hugh E. Montgomery, has just been awarded the prestigious Glazebrook Medal by the Institute of Physics.

The Glazebrook medal is one of four Gold medals awarded annually by the Institute of Physics, a society based in the United Kingdom with a worldwide membership of more than 50,000 who work to advance physics education, research and application.

According to the IOP, the medal is named after Sir Richard Tetley Glazebrook, the first director of the National Physical Laboratory in the United Kingdom and the first president of the Institute of Physics. The medal is presented each year in recognition of those who display outstanding leadership within the physics community.

Montgomery is being recognized for "his leadership at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and distinguished research in high-energy physics." He will receive the medal and a prize of £1,000 at the IOP awards dinner to be held later this year.

"It is flattering and pleasing to receive such a prestigious award. Of course, it is also a reflection of the people with whom it has been my privilege to work during my career," Montgomery said.
-end-
The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, or Jefferson Lab, is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, a joint venture of the Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc., and PAE Applied Technologies, for the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy.

DOE's Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, visit science.energy.gov.

DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

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