Nav: Home

Maternal vaccination again influenza associated with protection for infants

July 05, 2016

How long does the protection from a mother's immunization against influenza during pregnancy last for infants after they are born?

Marta C. Nunes, Ph.D., of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, and coauthors sought to answer that questions in an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. It's an important question because the incidence of influenza among infants is high and illness can cause hospitalizations and death. Also, current vaccines don't work well in infants less than 6 months of age and are not licensed for use in that age group.

Infants born to women who participated in a randomized clinical trial of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) when they were pregnant were followed up to determine the vaccine's efficacy against influenza and infant antibody levels during their first six months of life.

Analysis of the vaccine's efficacy included 1,026 infants born to women immunized with IIV3 and 1,023 infants born to women given placebo. The vaccine's efficacy against influenza illness was highest when infants were 8 weeks or younger at 85.6 percent but decreased as the infants grew to 25.5 percent among infants 8 to 16 weeks and to 30.3 percent among infants 16 to 24 weeks, according to the results.

Additionally, in a subset of infants, the percentage of infants with antibodies at or above a certain level dropped from 56 percent in the first week of life to less than 10 percent at 24 weeks of age.

Study limitations include that the same IIV3 formulation was used in both study years.

"We and others have previously demonstrated that the administration of IIV3 during pregnancy confers protection against symptomatic influenza infection to the infants of the vaccinated mothers; here we show that the duration of this protection is likely to be limited to the first 8 weeks of age. Several potential mechanisms of protection have been proposed ... Our study suggests that the most likely mechanism of protection of the infants is through the transplacental transfer of maternal antibodies," the authors conclude.

(JAMA Pediatr. Published online July 5, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.0921. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: The study includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, etc.

Editorial: Infant Protection Against Influenza Through Maternal Immunization

"The study of Nunes et al contributes significantly to our understanding of infant protection against influenza through maternal vaccination," Flor M. Munoz, M.D., of the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, writes in a related editorial.

(JAMA Pediatr. Published online July 5, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.1322. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: Please see article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, etc.
-end-
Media Advisory: To contact study author Marta C. Nunes, Ph.D., email nunesm@rmpru.co.za. To contact editorial author Flor M. Munoz, M.D., call Dipali Pathak at 713-798-4710 or email pathak@bcm.edu.

The JAMA Network Journals

Related Influenza Articles:

How proteins help influenza A bind and slice its way to cells
Researchers have provided new insight on how two proteins help influenza A virus particles fight their way to human cells.
Eating elderberries can help minimize influenza symptoms
Conducted by Professor Fariba Deghani, Dr. Golnoosh Torabian and Dr.
Mechanism to form influenza A virus discovered
A new study by Maria João Amorim's team, from the Gulbenkian Institute of Science, now reveals where the genomes of the influenza A virus are assembled inside infected cells.
Bat influenza viruses could infect humans
Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus, but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus.
New VaxArray publication on influenza neuraminidase quantification
InDevR Inc. announced publication of 'A Neuraminidase Potency Assay for Quantitative Assessment of Neuraminidase in Influenza Vaccines' in npj Vaccines.
More Influenza News and Influenza Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...