Nav: Home

Older patients with knee pain may benefit from allograft transplant technique

July 05, 2018

SAN DIEGO, CA - Knee pain in active patients over 40 is often difficult to treat but according to researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in San Diego utilizing a special kind of allograft may be a step in the right direction.

"Our findings note that patients older than 40 may benefit from using a fresh osteochondral allograft transplantation to treat focal cartilage defects, a common cause of knee pain in adults," said lead author, Dennis Crawford, MD, PhD from the Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, Oregon.

Crawford and his colleagues looked at a total of 80 patients broken into two groups. The study group consisted of 38 patients, 10 women and 28 men who were at least 40 years of age and a control group with 42 patients (27 men and 15 women) who were 39 years of age or younger. A statistically significant improvement for both groups was noted for the final follow-up for IKDC and all five KOOS sub-scores. Greatest changes were seen in the ability of patients to perform Sports and with improvement in healthful daily activity. Previous surgical treatment was performed on 31 of 38 knees in the study group and 37 of the 42 knees in the control group.

"This type of osteochondral allograft transplantation has traditionally been used in younger active patients with cartilage disorders. However, seeing this type of success allows sports medicine physicians another option in older patients and serves as a predictable biologic joint preservation technique," said Crawford.
-end-
The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) is the premier global, sports medicine organization representing the interests of orthopaedic surgeons and other professionals who provide comprehensive health services for the care of athletes and active people of all ages and levels. We cultivate evidence-based knowledge, provide extensive educational programming, and promote emerging research that advances the science and practice of sports medicine. AOSSM is also a founding partner of the STOP Sports Injuries campaign to prevent overuse and traumatic injuries in kids.

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

Related Sports Medicine Articles:

Jumping to your death? Motivations of extreme sports
Researchers have debunked the myth that extreme sportsmen and women are adrenalin junkies with a death wish, according to a new study.
New study looks at LGBT allies in college sports
The sports world has not always been considered inviting for those who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender.
Sports that will save your life revealed: New research
An international research collaboration, led by University of Sydney, has found that cycling, swimming, aerobics and racquet sports offer life saving benefits compared to running and football.
Two Baylor College of Medicine faculty members named to National Academy of Medicine
Dr. Malcolm Brenner and Dr. Cheryl Walker, both renowned leaders in their respective fields, were elected to membership in the National Academy of Medicine.
What sports matches reveal about gender roles
In the modern era, it's clear that women can do just about anything that men can do.
Children consuming sports drinks unnecessarily
A high proportion of 12- to 14-year-olds are regularly consuming sports drinks socially, increasing their risk of obesity and tooth erosion, concludes a Cardiff University School of Dentistry survey.
BGI and UW Medicine to collaborate on precision medicine development
BGI, one of the world's largest genomics organizations, and UW Medicine, the academic medical and health system at the University of Washington, have signed a memorandum of understanding to collaborate on biomedical technology development.
A sex difference in sports interest: What does evolution say?
Sports are enormously popular, and one striking pattern is that boys and men are typically much more involved than are girls and women.
Augmented games can increase the diversity of sports
An augmented climbing wall increases social interaction, helps to attract wider target audiences and empowers users to become content creators.
New analytical model for e-sports predicts who is winning -- and why
A new analytical model for e-sports developed by researchers in Sweden, Denmark and Germany, not only helps game developers better understand how players perform, but can also predict the outcome of the game.

Related Sports Medicine Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Bias And Perception
How does bias distort our thinking, our listening, our beliefs... and even our search results? How can we fight it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas about the unconscious biases that shape us. Guests include writer and broadcaster Yassmin Abdel-Magied, climatologist J. Marshall Shepherd, journalist Andreas Ekström, and experimental psychologist Tony Salvador.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#513 Dinosaur Tails
This week: dinosaurs! We're discussing dinosaur tails, bipedalism, paleontology public outreach, dinosaur MOOCs, and other neat dinosaur related things with Dr. Scott Persons from the University of Alberta, who is also the author of the book "Dinosaurs of the Alberta Badlands".