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Cost-effectiveness study of risk-based screenings for breast cancer

July 05, 2018

BottomLine: A cost-effectiveness study used a hypothetical group of women in the United Kingdom to compare risk-based breast cancer screening programs with a standard age-based screening program and no screening. Analysis was done from the perspective of the National Health Service.

Authors: Nora Pashayan, M.D., Ph.D., of University College London, England, and coauthors

Related Material: A podcast and editorial, "Implementation Challenges for Risk-Stratified Screening in the Era of Precision Medicine," by Megan C. Roberts, Ph.D., of the National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland, also are available on the For The Media website.

To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.1901)

Editor's Note: The article contains funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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Want to embed a link to this study in your story?: Links will be live at the embargo time http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaoncology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaoncol.2018.1901

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