Highlights from the July 2007 Journal of the American Dietetic Association

July 06, 2007

CHICAGO -- The July 2007 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association contains articles and research studies you may find of interest. Below is a summary of some of this month's articles.

Children Prefer Large Portions ... of Some Foods

Given the choice, Canadian fifth-graders prefer larger portions of snacks and fast foods and smaller portions of vegetables than the recommended amounts, according to researchers at Dalhousie University in Canada.

The researchers showed nearly 5,000 children a variety of portion sizes of french fries, meat, cooked vegetables and potato chips and asked them to indicate their "usual portion sizes." More than 63 percent of the children chose french fry portions that were larger than American and Canadian dietary recommendations, with boys more than twice as likely as girls to select bigger portions. "Significantly larger" portions for meat and chips were selected by about 78 percent the children; for vegetables, 52 percent chose portion sizes smaller than or equal to dietary guidelines.

The study found kids who ate at fast-food restaurants more than once per week were more likely to consider large portions of fries and small portions of vegetables to be "usual," as did children from socioeconomically disadvantaged families and those who frequently ate while watching television.

"This study demonstrates that a great deal can be gained by expanding nutrition education with respect to moderation and choosing appropriate portion sizes," the researchers write.

African-American Girls Consume Fewer Micronutrients than Caucasian Girls

African-American adolescent and teenage girls consume less vitamin A and D, calcium and magnesium compared to Caucasian girls, according to researchers at St. Joseph College, Wesleyan University and other institutions. Regardless of race, the researchers also found a "substantial" percentage of girls had intakes of vitamin E, magnesium and folate that fall below recommended guidelines.

The researchers studied data from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's National Growth and Healthy Study of nearly 1,200 white girls and more than 1,200 African-American girls to determine their usual daily intakes of vitamins A, E, C, D, B6, B12, magnesium, folate, calcium and zinc.

The study reported that Caucasian girls tend to consume greater amounts of micronutrients compared to African-American girls, with the exception of vitamins E and C and zinc. Intakes of vitamins A, D and C; calcium; and magnesium tend to decrease with age for all girls, but the rate of decreased intake of vitamin D, calcium and magnesium is greater among African-American girls.

The researchers speculate that, as girls age, "the nutrient density of their diet (decreases), and this tendency (is) more pronounced among African-American girls. Food and nutrition professionals should focus their counseling efforts on improving diets of young girls, particularly those who are African-American,"

Additional research articles in the July Journal of the American Dietetic Association include:
-end-
For more information or to receive a copy of a Journal article, e-mail media@eatright.org.

The Journal of the American Dietetic Association is the official research publication of the American Dietetic Association and is the premier peer-reviewed journal in the field of nutrition and dietetics.

With more than 67,000 members, the American Dietetic Association is the nation's largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. ADA serves the public by promoting optimal nutrition, health and well-being. To locate a registered dietitian in your area, visit the American Dietetic Association at www.eatright.org.

American Dietetic Association

Related Calcium Articles from Brightsurf:

A new strategy for the greener use of calcium carbide
Computational chemists from St Petersburg University and the Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have developed a new strategy for using calcium acetylide in the synthesis of organic compounds.

New link between calcium and cardiolipin in heart defects
To function properly, the heart needs energy from cells' powerhouses, the mitochondria.

'Give me the calcium!' Tulane virus takes over cellular calcium signaling to replicate
Researchers uncover the first piece of functional evidence suggesting that Tulane virus and human norovirus use viroporins to control cellular calcium signaling.

Carbon dots make calcium easier to track
Prof. DONG Wenfei's research group from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology (SIBET) has developed a new type of fluorescent carbon dot that can effectively detect calcium levels in cells.

Calcium batteries: New electrolytes, enhanced properties
Calcium-based batteries promise to reach a high energy density at low manufacturing costs.

Chelated calcium benefits poinsettias
Cutting quality has an impact on postharvest durability during shipping and propagation of poinsettias.

New study uncovers the interaction of calcium channels
Korean researchers have identified the interactions of the combinants among calcium channel proteins that exist in nerve and heart cells.

Calcium-catalyzed reactions of element-H bonds
Calcium-catalyzed reactions of element-H bonds provide precise and efficient tools for hydrofunctionalization.

A bioengineered tattoo monitors blood calcium levels
Scientists have created a biomedical tattoo that becomes visible on the skin of mice in response to elevated levels of calcium in the blood.

The dinosaur menu, as revealed by calcium
By studying calcium in fossil remains in deposits in Morocco and Niger, researchers have been able to reconstruct the food chains of the past, thus explaining how so many predators could coexist in the dinosaurs' time.

Read More: Calcium News and Calcium Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.