Landsat 5 captures Missouri River flooding near Omaha

July 06, 2011

Landsat 5 captured an image of flooding occurring along the Iowa/Nebraska border on June 30, 2011. Flooding is still occurring on July 6, and Flood Warnings are still in effect from the National Weather Service.

The Landsat 5 image captured was an enlargement of the area just north of Omaha. The flood waters show up as very dark blue and, where the water is shallow, medium blue. In the image, the Interstate is cut off by flood waters, just south of Missouri Valley, Iowa, and about 20 miles north of Omaha.

According to Omaha.com, officials from federal, state and local agencies will begin damage assessments from the flooding in the six Iowa counties that line the Missouri River. WOWT-TV reported on July 6 that part of U.S. Highway 30 from Blair to I-29 will be closed today, July 6, until the morning of July 8. The Iowa Department of Transportation closed the road to install a flood barrier.

On July 6, 2011 at 9:39 a.m. CDT, the National Weather Service posted several flood warnings. Flood warnings are in effect for: The Missouri River at Decatur affecting Monona, Burt and Thurston Counties; Missouri River near Blair affecting Harrison and Washington Counties; The Missouri River at Omaha affecting Pottawattamie, Douglas and Sarpy Counties; The Missouri River at Plattsmouth affecting Mills and Cass Counties; the Missouri River at Nebraska City affecting Fremont and Otoe Counties; the Missouri River at Brownville affecting Atchison and Nemaha Counties; and the Missouri River at Rulo affecting Holt and Richardson Counties.

The Landsat Program is a series of Earth-observing satellite missions jointly managed by NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey. Landsat satellites have been consistently gathering data about our planet since 1972. They continue to improve and expand this unparalleled record of Earth's changing landscapes, for the benefit of all. The next Landsat is scheduled to launch in December 2012.
-end-
For more information about the Landsat launching in 2012:

http://ldcm.gsfc.nasa.gov

For National Weather Service River flooding information, visit:

http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=oax

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Flooding Articles from Brightsurf:

Coastal flooding will disproportionately impact 31 million people globally
Indiana University researchers analyzed these geographic regions, which include cities like New Orleans, Bangkok, and Shanghai, using a new global dataset to determine how many people live on river deltas, how many are vulnerable to a 100-year storm surge event, and the ability of the deltas to naturally mitigate impacts of climate change.

New woodlands can help reduce flooding risk within 15 years
New research by the University of Plymouth suggests the planting of more trees could have a significant and positive effect in preventing flash flooding.

Land use change leads to increased flooding in Indonesia
While high greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity loss are often associated with rapid land-use change in Indonesia, impacts on local water cycles have been largely overlooked.

Climate change: Coastal flooding could threaten up to 20% of global GDP
Coastal flooding events could threaten assets worth up to 20% of the global GDP by 2100, a study in Scientific Reports suggests.

River plants counter both flooding and drought to protect biodiversity
'Water plants are a nuisance in streams, blocking the flow.

Scientists predict dramatic increase in flooding, drought in California
California may see a 54 percent increase in rainfall variability by the end of this century, according to research from a UC Davis atmospheric scientist.

Multiple flooding sources threaten Honolulu's infrastructure
In a study published in Scientific Reports, researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, found in the next few decades, sea level rise will likely cause large and increasing percentages of land area to be impacted simultaneously by the three flood mechanisms.

Climate change: Extreme coastal flooding events in the US expected to rise
Extreme flooding events in some US coastal areas could double every five years if sea levels continue to rise as expected, a study published in Scientific Reports suggests.

Study find delta helps to decrease the impact of river flooding
Most coastal cities and ports face a double threat from storm surge and river flooding.

Texas A&M researchers develop flooding prediction tool
By incorporating the architecture of city drainage systems and readings from flood gauges into a comprehensive statistical framework, researchers at Texas A&M University can now accurately predict the evolution of floods in extreme situations like hurricanes.

Read More: Flooding News and Flooding Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.