Nav: Home

Is molecular adsorbent recirculating system effective for all the liver failure patients?

July 07, 2009

Since its introduction in 1993, molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) albumin dialysis has been a subject of research, with the hope of treating effectively patients with acute liver failure. The impact of MARS treatment on outcome as well as clinical and laboratory variables has been investigated widely in small non-randomized studies. However, larger studies with longer follow-up time are required to determine the true usefulness of MARS treatment in different liver failure etiologies.

An article to be published on June 28 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addressed this issue. The research led by Taru Kantola from Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland discussed the prognostic factors for survival in patients with acute liver failure. The authors analysed the 1-year outcomes of 188 patients treated with MARS from 2001 to 2007, in an intensive care unit specializing in liver diseases.

They found that the etiology of liver failure was the most important predictor of survival. In acute liver failure (ALF) of toxic etiology (e.g., paracetamol), the grade of encephalopathy before MARS treatment was a significant prognostic factor. In ALF of unknown etiology, coagulation factor 5 and liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase levels were prognostic. According to the results, the MARS treatment of a cirrhotic patient with an acute-on-chronic liver failure is not meaningful in terms of prognosis if the patient is not eligible for transplantation.

-end-

Reference: Kantola T, Koivusalo AM, Parmanen S, Höckerstedt K, Isoniemi H. Survival predictors in patients treated with a molecular adsorbent recirculating system. World J Gastroenterol 2009; 15(24): 3015-3024. http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/15/3015.asp

Correspondence to: Dr. Taru Kantola, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Surgical Hospital of Helsinki, Helsinki University Central Hospital, PO Box 263, FIN-0029 HUCH, Helsinki, Finland. taru.kantola@hus.fi

About World Journal of Gastroenterology

World Journal of Gastroenterology (WJG), a leading international journal in gastroenterology and hepatology, has established a reputation for publishing first class research on esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, viral hepatitis, colorectal cancer, and H pylori infection and provides a forum for both clinicians and scientists. WJG has been indexed and abstracted in Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, Science Citation Index Expanded (also known as SciSearch) and Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Index Medicus, MEDLINE and PubMed, Chemical Abstracts, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, Abstracts Journals, Nature Clinical Practice Gastroenterology and Hepatology, CAB Abstracts and Global Health. ISI JCR 2008 IF: 2.081. WJG is a weekly journal published by WJG Press. The publication dates are the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day of every month. WJG is supported by The National Natural Science Foundation of China, No. 30224801 and No. 30424812, and was founded with the name of China National Journal of New Gastroenterology on October 1, 1995, and renamed WJG on January 25, 1998.

About The WJG Press

The WJG Press mainly publishes World Journal of Gastroenterology.

World Journal of Gastroenterology

Related Mars Articles:

How hard did it rain on Mars?
Heavy rain on Mars reshaped the planet's impact craters and carved out river-like channels in its surface billions of years ago, according to a new study published in Icarus.
Does Mars have rings? Not right now, but maybe one day
Purdue researchers developed a model that suggests that debris that was pushed into space from an asteroid or other body slamming into Mars around 4.3 billion years ago and alternates between becoming a planetary ring and clumping up to form a moon.
Digging deeper into Mars
Scientists continue to unravel the mystery of life on Mars by investigating evidence of water in the planet's soil.
A bewildering form of dune on Mars
Researchers have discovered a type of dune on Mars intermediate in size between tiny ripples and wavier dunes, and unlike anything seen on Earth.
Mars is emerging from an ice age
Radar measurements of Mars' polar ice caps reveal that the mostly dry, dusty planet is emerging from an ice age, following multiple rounds of climate change.
Shifting sands on Mars
University of Iowa researchers have a $501,000 NASA grant to travel to Iceland to better understand sand dunes found all over the planet Mars.
Potatoes on Mars
A team of world-class CIP and NASA scientists will grow potatoes under Martian conditions in a bid to save millions of lives.
You too can learn to farm on Mars!
Scientists at Washington State University and the University of Idaho are helping students figure out how to farm on Mars, much like astronaut Mark Watney, played by Matt Damon, attempts in the critically acclaimed movie 'The Martian.'
Similarities between aurorae on Mars and Earth
An international team of researchers has for the first time predicted the occurrence of aurorae visible to the naked eye on a planet other than Earth.
Mars might have liquid water
Researchers have long known that there is water in the form of ice on Mars.

Best Science Podcasts 2017

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2017. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Oliver Sipple
One morning, Oliver Sipple went out for a walk. A couple hours later, to his own surprise, he saved the life of the President of the United States. But in the days that followed, Sipple's split-second act of heroism turned into a rationale for making his personal life into political opportunity. What happens next makes us wonder what a moment, or a movement, or a whole society can demand of one person. And how much is too much?
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Future Consequences
From data collection to gene editing to AI, what we once considered science fiction is now becoming reality. This hour, TED speakers explore the future consequences of our present actions. Guests include designer Anab Jain, futurist Juan Enriquez, biologist Paul Knoepfler, and neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris.