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Is fluoride in drinking water safe? (video)

July 07, 2016

WASHINGTON, July 5, 2016 -- It's in our tap water, toothpaste and even in tea. Fluoride has helped reduce cavities in children for decades. Still, more than 70 years after Grand Rapids, Michigan, became the first city to fluoridate its drinking water, the practice remains controversial. Some worry that fluoridated drinking water can lead to health issues, but what is the scientific consensus? Find out in this week's episode of Reactions. Check it out here: https://youtu.be/a17v4bhhBuU.
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