Nav: Home

Hamstring injuries in baseball may be preventable

July 08, 2016

COLORADO SPRINGS, CO - Creating a program to prevent hamstring injuries in minor league and major league baseball players might be a possibility say researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO.

"Hamstring injuries, both acute and chronic are on the rise in baseball and injury prevention programs may help stem this trend," says lead author, Holly Silvers-Granelli, MPT, PhD Candidate at the University of Delaware in Newark, Delaware.

Silvers-Granelli and her team assessed 213 athletes from minor league (173 players) and major league (40 players) teams and provided a portion of these individuals with a hamstring injury prevention program, including both concentric and eccentric hamstring exercises and lumbo-pelvic stability exercises preparing the athlete for the demands of competitive baseball from a neuromuscular perspective. The average weighted utilization of the injury prevention program was 25.3 doses for the uninjured group and 13.53 doses in the injured group. In those individuals who followed the injury prevention program there was a 40% reduction in hamstring injuries. In addition there was a significant reduction in playing time lost due to injury in both groups who participated in the program. For the Major League players there were 9 vs. 25.9 days lost, or a 65% reduction. The Minor League players who participated in the prevention program had a similar reduction of 45.3% in lost playing time.

This research was a prospective cluster cohort study. Each athlete completed a questionnaire detailing their hamstring injury history. The injury prevention program was disseminated to each team medical staff (team physician, certified athletic trainer and strength and conditioning coach). The medical staffs were instructed on how to implement the program. At the end of the season, the data was analyzed for compliance and injury rates and compared to the MLB control date in the HITS database.

"Our study confirmed that utilizing hamstring injury prevention programs can help lessen lost play time and be a cost efficient way to do so. Further research is needed to fine tune the best mechanisms for these injury reduction programs," said Silvers-Granelli.
-end-
The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) is a global leader in orthopaedic sports medicine education, research, communication and fellowship, and includes national and international sports medicine leaders. The Society works closely with many other sports medicine specialists, including athletic trainers, physical therapists, family physicians, and others to improve the identification, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports injuries. AOSSM is also a founding partner of the STOP Sports Injuries campaign to prevent overuse and traumatic injuries in kids.

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

Related Baseball Articles:

Sleep extension improves response time, reduces fatigue in professional baseball players
Preliminary results from a new study suggest that short-term sleep extension improves response time and daytime functioning of professional baseball players.
Shoulder injuries in professional baseball players: A continuing puzzle
Professional baseball players struggle to return to a high level of play after biceps tenodesis (BP) surgery, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day in San Diego.
Study identifies modifiable risk factors for elbow injuries in baseball pitchers
Elbow injuries continue to be on the rise in baseball players, especially pitchers, yet little is known about the actual variables that influence these injuries.
Wikipedia readers get shortchanged by copyrighted material
When Google Books digitized 40 years worth of copyrighted and out-of-copyright issues of Baseball Digest magazine, Wikipedia editors realized they had scored.
Jet lag impairs performance of Major League Baseball players
A Northwestern University study of how jet lag affects Major League Baseball players traveling across just a few time zones found that when players travel in a way that misaligns their internal 24-hour clock with the natural environment and its cycle of sunlight, they suffer negative consequences.
Heavy hitters: Obesity rate soars among professional baseball players
Major League Baseball players have become overwhelmingly overweight and obese during the last quarter century, say health researchers.
Hamstring injuries in baseball may be preventable
Creating a program to prevent hamstring injuries in minor league and major league baseball players might be a possibility say researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, Colo.
No long-term 'star effect' for baseball teams on Twitter
University of Missouri researchers have analyzed the Twitter usage of Major League Baseball (MLB) teams, athletes and fans and discovered that the 'star effect' had no long-term impacts on MLB teams' Twitter following and fan engagement.
NJIT professor predicts winners of Major League 2016 Baseball season: The Mets come out on top
After being one of the few who picked the Mets to make it to the postseason in 2015, NJIT Mathematical Sciences Professor and Associate Dean Bruce Bukiet has published his projections of how the standings should look at the end of Major League Baseball's 2016 season.
Young baseball players could benefit from preseason arm injury prevention programs
Preseason prevention programs are beneficial to young baseball pitchers, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty Day.

Related Baseball Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Crisis
There's no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time. Guests include climate activist Greta Thunberg, chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox, research scientist Sean Davis, food innovator Bruce Friedrich, and psychologist Per Espen Stoknes.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...