Nav: Home

Summer Eurasian nonuniform warming found related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation

July 08, 2019

The positive-phase of Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) can indeed cause Eurasian summer nonuniform warming, according to Prof. Shuanglin Li, Dean of Atmospheric Science at the University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Executive Vice-Director at the Climate Change Research Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and one of the authors of a recently published study.

Prof. Shuanglin Li and his team--a group of researchers form the Climate Change Research Center and State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Institute of Atmospheric Physics--have had their findings published in Advances of Atmospheric Sciences.

"Previous studies indicate the Eurasian nonuniform since the mid-1990s may be related with the phase shift of the AMO, and we validate this point by using ensemble experiments with three AGCMs [atmospheric general circulation models]", the lead author says. "The overall consistency among the three AGCMs illustrates the robustness of the AMO's in?uence, although the models are not the most recent updated versions", she adds.

Then, the authors diagnose the underlying mechanism of the AMO's influence on the Eurasian nonuniform warming from the perspective that the boundary forcing modulates the intrinsic atmospheric variability. The results highlight the role of the Silk Road Pattern.

"The AMO-related tropical diabatic heating anomaly excites the Silk Road wave-train over Eurasia with positive geopotential height and anticyclonic circulation anomalies over Europe-West Asia and Northeast Asia, but negative geopotential height and cyclonic circulation over Central Asia. Such opposite circulations lead to opposite changes in temperature advection, precipitation, cloud cover and solar radiation. When these effects overlap the signals of global warming, it causes ampli?ed warming," the authors explain.

"This work did not consider the effects of the negative phase of the AMO. Future work may be needed to find out whether symmetric, inverted nonuniform surface air temperature anomalies will be obtained for the cold period of the AMO", Prof. Li adds.
-end-


Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Related Work Articles:

Do open relationships really work?
Open relationships typically describe couples in which the partners have agreed on sexual activity with someone other than their primary romantic partner, while maintaining the couple bond.
Ebola antibodies at work
Scientists in Israel and Germany show, on the molecular level, how an experimental vaccine offers long-term protection against the disease.
Work that kills
More than 64% of employed Russians work evenings, nights or weekends, and this is one of the highest figures among European countries.
Root canal work not so bad after all
Root canal work is not as bad as people think when compared to other dental procedures.
Reattaching to work is just as important as detaching from work, study finds
Employees who mentally reattach to work in the morning are more engaged at work, according to a new study.
Be yourself at work -- It's healthier and more productive
At work, it's healthier and more productive just to be yourself, according to a new study from Rice University, Texas A&M University, the University of Memphis, Xavier University, Portland State University and the University of California, Berkeley.
For many, 'flexible work boundaries' become 'work without boundaries'
Personal relationships and home life suffer for those tied to their work emails round-the-clock, according to a new study.
How airbags work (video)
Normally, something blowing up in your face is bad. But in the event of a vehicle accident, and in conjunction with a seatbelt, one particular explosion could very well save your life.
Personality: Where does it come from and how does it work?
How do our personalities develop? What do we come with and what is built from our experiences?
Why some of your old work commitments never seem to go away
You can quit work commitments if you want - but some of them never really leave you, new research suggests.
More Work News and Work Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#543 Give a Nerd a Gift
Yup, you guessed it... it's Science for the People's annual holiday episode that helps you figure out what sciency books and gifts to get that special nerd on your list. Or maybe you're looking to build up your reading list for the holiday break and a geeky Christmas sweater to wear to an upcoming party. Returning are pop-science power-readers John Dupuis and Joanne Manaster to dish on the best science books they read this past year. And Rachelle Saunders and Bethany Brookshire squee in delight over some truly delightful science-themed non-book objects for those whose bookshelves are already full. Since...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab