Nav: Home

Castor oil-based inhibitors to remove gas hydrate plugs in Arctic deposits

July 08, 2019

Gas hydrate plugs not only obstruct flow but also speed up metal deformation. Resulting accidents are both a financial and an environmental burden. Previously, such plugs were removed mechanically, but today this method is being replaced by inhibitors.

Thermodynamic inhibitors (based mostly on methanol) obstruct the gas hydrate formation reactions, but methanol is quite detrimental to the environment. Kinetic inhibitors create physical obstacles for the gas flow so that gas hydrates form significantly slower; however, they are relatively expensive and not biodegradable.

"In this work, we tried to solve the existing problems by using castor oil," says co-author, project head Mikhail Varfolomeev. "We tested the substance together with the Federal Center for Toxicological Safety, and we found out that the inhibitor can be used both on land and in sea. The reagent slows down hydrate formation and hinders aggregation."

The castor-based waterborne polyurea/urethanes (CWPUUs) were synthesized on the basis of the waterborne technique. The high-pressure autoclave cell and high-pressure micro-differential scanning calorimeter using methane gas were applied to evaluate the inhibition performance of CWPUUs as an inhibitor for methane gas hydrate formation. The results of gas uptake tests confirm that the CWPUUs show high efficiency as kinetic hydrate inhibitors.

The method may lead to creating fully water-soluble materials. Tests show that a hybrid thermodynamic-kinetic technology may be proposed with much higher biodegradability and environmental safety.
-end-


Kazan Federal University

Related Methane Gas Articles:

European satellite data shows extreme methane emissions from Permian oil & gas operations
Study shows twice the average emissions rate of 11 other major US production regions; paper demonstrates potential for space-based data to drive down methane loss rates.
Offshore oil and gas platforms release more methane than previously estimated
Offshore energy-producing platforms in US waters of the Gulf of Mexico are emitting twice as much methane, a greenhouse gas, than previously thought, according to a new study from the University of Michigan.
New 3D view of methane tracks sources
NASA's new 3-dimensional portrait of methane concentrations shows the world's second largest contributor to greenhouse warming.
Computer model solves mystery of how gas bubbles build big methane hydrate deposits
New research from The University of Texas at Austin has explained an important mystery about natural gas hydrate formations and, in doing so, advanced scientists' understanding of how gas hydrates could contribute to climate change and energy security.
Show me the methane
Though not as prevalent in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, methane is a far more potent greenhouse gas.
Containing methane and its contribution to global warming
Methane is a gas that deserves more attention in the climate debate as it contributes to almost half of human-made global warming in the short-term.
Climate gas budgets highly overestimate methane discharge from Arctic Ocean
There is a huge seasonal variability in methane seeps in the Arctic Ocean, according to a new paper in Nature Geoscience.
Replacing one gas with another helps efficiently extract methane from permafrost
Scientists from Skoltech and Heriot-Watt University proposed extracting methane by injecting flue gas into permafrost hydrate reservoirs.
Effects of natural gas assessed in study of shale gas boom in Appalachian basin
A new study estimated the cumulative effects of the shale gas boom in the Appalachian basin in the early 2000s on air quality, climate change, and employment.
Atmospheric pressure impacts greenhouse gas emissions from leaky oil and gas wells
Fluctuations in atmospheric pressure can heavily influence how much natural gas leaks from wells below the ground surface at oil and gas sites, according to new University of British Columbia research.
More Methane Gas News and Methane Gas Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Mindset
In the past few months, human beings have come together to fight a global threat. This hour, TED speakers explore how our response can be the catalyst to fight another global crisis: climate change. Guests include political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac, diplomat Christiana Figueres, climate justice activist Xiye Bastida, and writer, illustrator, and artist Oliver Jeffers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.