Nav: Home

Scientists create new 'y-shaped' synthetic consortium for efficient bio-manufacturing

July 08, 2019

A group of Chinese scientists have recently developed a new synthetic consortium for efficient pentose-hexose co-utilization that could improve bio-manufacturing. Converting biomass into valuable fuels and chemicals using microbes is a hot topic in bio-manufacturing. However, inefficient pentose-hexose co-utilization has hindered the conversion process.

Professor LI Yin and his team at the Institute of Microbiology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMCAS) proposed using a Y-shaped consortium to solve this problem. They took butanol as the target product and developed a Y-shaped synthetic consortium using systematically engineered E. coli strains.

The "Y-shaped" synthetic consortium is composed of two engineering strains derived from the same original strain. The two separate "heads" represent the pentose and hextose metabolic pathways, while the unitary "body" represents the synthetic pathway of the target product.

In batch fermentation of mixed sugars, this Y-shaped synthetic consortium has achieved a yield of ~21 g/L butanol. This represents 85% of the theoretical value, the highest percentage yield ever reported, according to LI's team.

Further analysis has shown that efficient simultaneous utilization of sugar mixtures with different pentose/hexose ratios and different aeration conditions can be achieved by adjusting the initial structure of the Y-shaped consortium.

"This further indicates the adaptability and stability of the Y-shaped consortium, which may be used in industrial production," said LI.

This work provides new insights into efficient pentose-hextose co-utilization by a synthetic microbiome. It also lays a foundation for further reducing the cost of producing biobutanol.
-end-
The study, published in Metabolic Engineering, was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China.

Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters

Related Microbiology Articles:

79 Fellows elected to the American Academy of Microbiology
In January of 2015, the American Academy of Microbiology elected 79 new Fellows.
New discovery in the microbiology of serious human disease
Previously undiscovered secrets of how human cells interact with a bacterium which causes a serious human disease have been revealed in new research by microbiologists at The University of Nottingham.
4 cells turn seabed microbiology upside down
With DNA from just four cells, researchers reveal how some of the world's most abundant organisms play a key role in carbon cycling in the seabed.
87 scientists elected to the American Academy of Microbiology
Eighty-seven microbiologists have been elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology.
Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
This release includes information about these articles: Specific Bacterial Species May Initiate, Maintain Crohn's; Bacteria Involved in Sewer Pipe Corrosion Identified; Antibodies to Immune Cells Protect Eyes In Pseudomonas Infection; Dangerous Form of MRSA, Endemic In Many US Hospitals, Increasing in UK.
Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
Upcoming articles from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology include:
Microbiology brought to life in Nottingham
Antimicrobial insect brains, mouth bacteria behaving badly and the hundreds of microbial communities that lurk in household dust are just some of the highlights at the Society for General Microbiology's autumn meeting in Nottingham next week.
Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
The following are tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology:
Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
The following are tips from the Journals of the American Society for Microbiology:
New text focuses on microbiology of historic artifacts
Historic and culturally important artifacts, like all materials, are vulnerable to microbial attack.
More Microbiology News and Microbiology Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Clint Smith
The killing of George Floyd by a police officer has sparked massive protests nationwide. This hour, writer and scholar Clint Smith reflects on this moment, through conversation, letters, and poetry.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.