Nav: Home

Alzheimer's disease probably more common than currently recognized

July 09, 2000

According to study presented at Alzheimer's meeting

A presentation at the World Alzheimer Congress 2000 today suggests that decline in memory in older persons is frequently due to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Current estimates put the number of people with AD in the United States at 4 million people, but the study suggests that the actual number may be much larger.

Dr. David Bennett, director of the Rush Alzheimer's Research Center at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago, examined the rate of change in memory function over six years in nearly 750 older nuns, priests and brothers participating in the Religious Orders Study, a longitudinal clinical-pathologic study of aging and AD. In addition, Bennett measured the amount of Alzheimer's disease pathology in the first 100 participants who had a brain autopsy.

According to Bennett, the research examined the extent to which people with mild cognitive impairment are really expressing the earliest manifestations of the pathology of Alzheimer's disease -- as opposed to having mild cognitive impairment from some other cause.

Persons with mild cognitive impairment declined much faster on memory tests than persons with no cognitive impairment. Furthermore, Alzheimer's disease pathology was already present to a large degree in persons who died with mild cognitive impairment.

Because there is no consensus on how to diagnose mild cognitive impairment, Bennett and colleagues also examined the relation of Alzheimer's disease pathology to memory function just before death and to rates of change in memory over the several years prior to death. Alzheimer's disease pathology was related to both. Overall, the data suggest that many people with mild memory problems who do not meet conventional criteria for dementia are exhibiting the pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

"Often, these people are not diagnosed with Alzheimer's or told that their mild memory loss is part of normal aging," he said. Bennett stressed that this research could have significant public health implications. The way we fund research and patient care in this country is based, in part, on our ability to track, the numbers of people with this disease.

These data suggest that the magnitude of the public health problem posed by Alzheimer's disease may be even larger than commonly recognized and that increased funding for clinical care and research is needed to effectively combat this disease.
-end-
Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center includes the 809-bed Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital; 154-bed Johnston R. Bowman Health Center for the Elderly; Rush University (Rush Medical College, College of Nursing, College of Health Sciences and Graduate College); and seven Rush Institutes providing diagnosis, treatment and research into leading health problems. The medical center is the tertiary hub of the Rush System for Health, a comprehensive healthcare system capable of serving about two million people through its outpatient facilities and five member hospitals.




Royal Society of Chemistry

Related Memory Articles:

Taking photos of experiences boosts visual memory, impairs auditory memory
A quick glance at any social media platform will tell you that people love taking photos of their experiences -- whether they're lying on the beach, touring a museum, or just waiting in line at the grocery store.
Think you know how to improve your memory? Think again
Research from Katherine Duncan at the University of Toronto suggests we may have to rethink how we improve memory.
Improving memory with magnets
The ability to remember sounds, and manipulate them in our minds, is incredibly important to our daily lives -- without it we would not be able to understand a sentence, or do simple arithmetic.
Who has the better memory -- men or women?
In the battle of the sexes, women have long claimed that they can remember things better and longer than men can.
New study of the memory through optogenetics
A collaboration between Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and Harvard University pioneers the increase of memory using optogenetics in mice in Spain.
Peppermint tea can help improve your memory
Peppermint tea can improve long-term and working memory and in healthy adults.
A new glimpse into working memory
MIT study finds bursts of neural activity as the brain holds information in mind, overturns a long-held model.
Memory ensembles
For over forty years, neuro-scientists have been interested in the biological mechanisms underlying the storage of the information that our brain records every day.
What is your memory style?
Why is it that some people have richly detailed recollection of past experiences (episodic memory), while others tend to remember just the facts without details (semantic memory)?
Watching a memory form
Neuroscientists at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science have discovered a novel mechanism for memory formation.

Related Memory Reading:

Unlimited Memory: How to Use Advanced Learning Strategies to Learn Faster, Remember More and be More Productive
by Kevin Horsley (Author)

Memory Rescue: Supercharge Your Brain, Reverse Memory Loss, and Remember What Matters Most
by Daniel G. Amen (Author)

Mosby's Pharmacology Memory NoteCards: Visual, Mnemonic, and Memory Aids for Nurses
by JoAnn Zerwekh MSN EdD RN (Author)

The Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
by Jerry W. Rudy (Author)

The Memory Activity Book: Engaging Ways to Stimulate the Brain for People Living with Memory Loss or Demen Dementia
by DK (Author), Helen Lambert (Author)

Learning and Memory
by Mark A. Gluck (Author), Eduardo Mercado (Author), Catherine E. Myers (Author)

Redemption (Memory Man series)
by David Baldacci (Author)

The Memory Book: The Classic Guide to Improving Your Memory at Work, at School, and at Play
by Harry Lorayne (Author), Jerry Lucas (Author)

Dining Down Memory Lane: A Collection of Classic Baltimore Restaurants and their Recipes
by Shelley Howell (Author), Barb Clapp (Foreword)

As You Grow: A Modern Memory Book for Baby
by Korie Herold (Author), Paige Tate Select (Producer)

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Approaching With Kindness
We often forget to say the words "thank you." But can those two words change how you — and those around you — look at the world? This hour, TED speakers on the power of gratitude and appreciation. Guests include author AJ Jacobs, author and former baseball player Mike Robbins, Dr. Laura Trice, Professor of Management Christine Porath, and former Danish politician Özlem Cekic.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#509 Anisogamy: The Beginning of Male and Female
This week we discuss how the sperm and egg came to be, and how a difference of reproductive interest has led to sexual conflict in bed bugs. We'll be speaking with Dr. Geoff Parker, an evolutionary biologist credited with developing a theory to explain the evolution of two sexes, about anisogamy, sexual reproduction through the fusion of two different gametes: the egg and the sperm. Then we'll speak with Dr. Roberto Pereira, research scientist in urban entomology at the University of Florida, about traumatic insemination in bed bugs.