Crime scene to court

July 09, 2004

Forensic science has been variously described as fascinating, challenging and even frightening. If you have only a vague concept of what forensic science is, this book will provide the answer. Aimed at non-scientists, or those with limited scientific knowledge, 'Crime Scene to Court' covers all three main areas of an investigation where forensic science is practised, namely the scene of the crime, the forensic laboratory and the court.

The second edition of this book will be published on 30th July 2004. The first edition was very well received, as can be seen from the following reviews:

"A comprehensive, well written and well presented book ... compelling reading ... It has my wholehearted recommendation." The National Training Centre for Scientific Support to Crime Investigation

"Very good, ideal for students of forensic science and practitioners ..." Science & Justice

"Excellent and much-needed ... a useful introductory text" Chemistry & Industry

"... this is an excellent book for those about to enter forensic science or as a reference for those already practising." The Analyst

"... an absolute must for anyone studying forensic science or law ... this splendid book is packed with information ... excellent value for money ..." Education in Chemistry

"... I would have no hesitation in recommending this book ..." Chromatographia

"... a readable book written in a narrative style ..." Canadian Society of Forensic Science

"... well written and informative ... also accessible and recommended ..." Bioseparation

"... ideal for students of forensic science ..." Forensic Science Society

Coverage includes details of how crime scene and forensic examinations are conducted in the United Kingdom, the principles of crime scene investigations and the importance of this work in an investigation, and courtroom procedures and the role of the expert witness. The latest methods and techniques used in crime scene investigation and forensic laboratories are reported, cases are presented to illustrate why and how examinations are performed to generate forensic evidence and there is a bibliography for each chapter which provides further material for those readers wishing to delve deeper into the subject. This revised and updated edition also includes coverage on changes in professional requirements, the latest developments in DNA testing and two new chapters on computer based crimes and Bloodstain Pattern Analysis.

Ideal for those studying forensic science or law, the book is intended primarily for teaching and training purposes. However, anyone with a role in an investigation, for example police, crime scene investigators or indeed those called for jury service, will find this text an excellent source of information.
-end-


Royal Society of Chemistry

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