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New study finds that e-cigarettes increase cardiovascular risk as much as cigarettes

July 09, 2018

The usage of e-cigarettes containing nicotine has a significant impact on vascular functions claims new study. Research published in the SAGE journal, Vascular Medicine, has brought new research to light on the significant health risks of e-cigarettes with nicotine. The study revealed that smokers of e-cigarettes experienced the same, if not higher level of cardiovascular elevation for prolonged periods after smoking the e-cigarette. The findings have significant implications for our understanding of the use of e-cigarettes on long-term cardiovascular risk.

Conducted by Franzen et al., results were obtained by monitoring participant's vitals during and after they had smoked a cigarette, e-cigarette, or nicotine-free e-cigarette. The smoking lasted for one cigarette, at least 5 minutes, and the vaping lasted for one session for 5 minutes. Vitals were monitored for 2 hours from when smoking commenced.

Researchers found that using e-cigarettes and cigarettes, in comparison to nicotine-free e-cigarettes, had the same significant impact on vitals, with participant's blood pressure and heart rate being affected. Peripheral systolic blood pressure was raised significantly for 45 minutes after using an e-cigarette and 15 minutes after smoking a cigarette. Heart rate also remained elevated for 45 minutes for e-cigarettes, with the increase being higher than 8% for the first 30 minutes. In comparison, traditional cigarettes only raised heart rate for 30 minutes and there was again no change when using nicotine-free e-cigarettes. Franzen et al. use this data to state that the e-cigarettes can be as dangerous as cigarettes, simply concluding that:

"The increased parameters within the nicotine containing devices might be a link to an increased cardiovascular risk which is well known for cigarettes."

As one of the first trials studying blood pressure and heart rate elevation in relation to e-cigarette use, the authors emphasized the need for further studies in the area, stating:

"Future trials should focus on chronic effects of vaping nicotine-containing or nicotine free liquids on peripheral and central blood pressures as well as on arterial stiffness. Since no endothelial dysfunction nor gender differences were described for three different arms in literature, it would be important for future trials to address these items."

Along with highlighting further areas of discussion the study has provided clear evidence of the potential cardiovascular issues from acute e-cigarette use and diminishes the common thought that e-cigarettes are a lower risk than tobacco products.
-end-
The article, E-Cigarettes and Cigarettes worsen peripheral and central hemodynamics as well as arterial stiffness: A randomized, double-blinded pilot study by Klaas Franzen, et al., in Vascular Medicine, can be accessed here.

Sara Miller McCune founded SAGE Publishing in 1965 to support the dissemination of usable knowledge and educate a global community. SAGE is a leading international provider of innovative, high-quality content publishing more than 1,000 journals and over 800 new books each year, spanning a wide range of subject areas. Our growing selection of library products includes archives, data, case studies and video. SAGE remains majority owned by our founder and after her lifetime will become owned by a charitable trust that secures the company's continued independence. Principal offices are located in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore, Washington DC and Melbourne. http://www.sagepublishing.com

Vascular Medicine, the official Journal of Society for Vascular Medicine, is the premier and ISI ranked, peer-reviewed international journal of vascular medicine comprising original research articles, reviews and case reports on vascular biology, epidemiology, diagnosis, medical treatment and interventions for vascular disease. Vascular Medicine is dedicated to advancing the field of vascular medicine by publishing the latest clinical and scientific information in vascular medicine and related specialties and is currently inviting submissions of original research articles, reviews and case reports whose subject matter falls within the Journal's aims and scope.

SAGE

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