Nav: Home

NASA satellite tracking remnants of ex-Tropical Cyclone Beryl

July 09, 2018

Infrared imagery from NASA revealed two small area of strong storms remained in the remnants of Tropical Storm Beryl, moving into the eastern Caribbean Sea.

Beryl lost its tropical storm status by 5 p.m. EDT on July 8. Beryl degenerated into a remnant low pressure area before it crossed over the Northern Leeward Islands late on July 8.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Beryl on July 9 at 2:35 a.m. EDT (0635 UTC) and analyzed the storm in infrared light. The MODIS or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite revealed two small areas of strong thunderstorms where cloud top temperatures as cold or colder than minus 70 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 56.6 degrees Celsius). One area was in the eastern Caribbean Sea, the other over the Northern Leeward Islands. Cloud tops with temperatures that cold have the potential to generate very heavy rainfall.

At 8 a.m. EDT on July 9 the National Hurricane Center addressed the remnants of Beryl. NHC noted "An area of showers and thunderstorms associated with the remnants of Beryl is producing locally heavy rainfall and strong gusty winds over the northeastern Caribbean Sea and the northern Leeward Islands."

Forecasters at NHC expect the remnants to move west-northwestward for the next day or so, passing over the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico today, and over Hispaniola tonight.

NHC forecaster Stewart noted that "Unfavorable upper-level winds and interaction with land should prevent redevelopment during the next day or two, but environmental conditions could become somewhat conducive for regeneration of a tropical cyclone later this week when the system is forecast to turn northward over the Bahamas and the western Atlantic."
-end-
For updated forecasts, visit: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Thunderstorms Articles:

NASA sees 'nada' strength left in Tropical Cyclone Nada
NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Cyclone Nada in the Northern Indian Ocean and infrared imagery showed that Nada had 'nada' in terms of strong thunderstorms.
Lightning strikes: Thunderstorms spread mercury pollution
In a new study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, Assistant Professor of Meteorology Christopher Holmes writes that thunderstorms have 50 percent higher concentrations of mercury than other rain events.
NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Tropical Depression Kay sevoid of strength
NASA's Aqua satellite saw continually weakening Tropical Depression devoid of thunderstorms when it passed overhead early today, Aug.
NASA's GPM sees towering thunderstorms in intensifying Tropical Storm Earl
Tropical storm Earl has been intensifying as it moves through the Caribbean Sea.
NASA's GPM satellite examines tornadic thunderstorms
The Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission core satellite, a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, measured heavy rainfall in severe storms early on Friday, April 1, in the southern U.S.
NASA's GPM satellite examines violent thunderstorms
Severe weather moved through the southern US on Feb. 2-3, and NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellite examined the violent thunderstorms.
NASA's GPM reveals very strong thunderstorms in Typhoon Choi-Wan
NASA's GPM satellite saw strong thunderstorms remained in Typhoon Choi-wan as the storm continued to weaken.
NASA sees thunderstorms flaring up on Halola's eastern side
NASA infrared satellite imagery taken early on July 17 shows strong thunderstorms on the eastern side of Tropical Storm Halola.
Small thunderstorms may add up to massive cyclones on Saturn
In a paper published today in the journal Nature Geoscience, atmospheric scientists at MIT propose a possible mechanism for Saturn's polar cyclones: over time, small, short-lived thunderstorms across the planet may build up angular momentum, or spin, within the atmosphere -- ultimately stirring up a massive and long-lasting vortex at the poles.
Satellite shows Blanca's remnant moisture over New Mexico today
Today, June 10, the remnant moisture from Blanca is now over New Mexico where it is expected to generate some isolated to scattered thunderstorms.

Related Thunderstorms Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...