Global bid to bring world's leading cancer minds to Manchester, UK

July 10, 2013

A global recruitment drive to bring 20 of the world's best cancer experts and their teams to Manchester, in the United Kingdom, is now underway.

Specialist cancer centre The Christie NHS Foundation Trust and The University of Manchester are jointly funding the £30 million plan as part of their role in the Manchester Cancer Research Centre (MCRC).

The recruitment bid will bring 20 top-flight academics and their teams of experts to the city. In total it will attract 100 new staff with clinical, research and teaching expertise in screening and prevention; lung cancer; radiotherapy; haematological oncology; women's cancer; melanoma and personalised cancer therapy.

Around 13 of the academic posts and their associated teams will have a clinical base within The Christie as well as a university role. The remaining science roles will be based within the MCRC - a unique collaboration between The Christie, The University of Manchester and Cancer Research UK (CR-UK). The majority of these posts will be based in a custom-built facility due to open in 2014, opposite The Christie in south Manchester. The flagship building has been designed to bring research into cancer biology, drug discovery and clinical trials together. Some posts will also be based in the neighbouring CR-UK Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, part of The University of Manchester.

All new posts are also part of a series of large-scale initiatives in health care and health science being driven by the Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC) - which is a partnership of six of Greater Manchester's NHS Trusts, including The Christie, and The University of Manchester. The partnership prioritises key areas of health within Greater Manchester, one of which is cancer. The package of support will fund cancer leaders and their teams for five years as well as providing some laboratory set-up costs and materials to enable the teams to carry out experiments.

Caroline Shaw, Chief Executive of The Christie, said: "This is a major coup for Manchester. It means that our patients will have the chance to be the very first people to participate in global trials and have access to the very latest cancer treatments.

"The new staff will play a huge part in teaching and inspiring the next generation of cancer doctors as they form a solid bridge between academic and practical training."

Professor Ian Jacobs, Dean of the Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Vice President of The University of Manchester and also MAHSC Director, said: "An investment on this scale is hugely significant by world standards and a first for cancer research in Manchester. It will enable us to add to our already excellent team by recruiting some of the brightest international research talent in cancer to the city.

"It has come about because of the investment of The Christie charity and The University of Manchester - and reflects our ambition to be a world leader in both research and patient care.

"The new posts will provide a step change in the way researchers and clinicians combine forces to tackle cancer."

Professor Richard Marais, Director of Cancer Research UK's Paterson Institute based at The University of Manchester, said: "We hope to begin advertising for these posts, including four group leaders funded by CR-UK, in the Autumn. This is an exciting time for science and the search for treatments and Manchester continues to playing a key role in this work."

Professor Nic Jones, Director of the MCRC, said: "This big cash-injection will add to the high-calibre scientists who form part of the Manchester Cancer Research Centre - many of whom will be based at our new flagship building due to open in summer 2014. It will bring even more researchers and specialists together in Manchester widening even further our range of expertise and helping to revolutionise cancer treatment and translate research into treatments which can benefit patients."
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University of Manchester

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