National Academies news: Young engineers selected to participate in engineering symposium

July 11, 2006

WASHINGTON -- Eighty-one of the nation's brightest young engineers have been selected to take part in the National Academy of Engineering's (NAE) 12th annual Frontiers of Engineering symposium. The 2½-day event will bring together engineers ages 30 to 45 who are performing cutting-edge engineering research and technical work in a variety of disciplines. The participants -- from industry, academia, and government -- were nominated by fellow engineers or organizations and chosen from nearly 200 applicants. "At Frontiers of Engineering, engineers share know-how from multiple fields and initiate collaborations that may one day solve complex problems," said NAE President Wm. A. Wulf. "Engineers like these -- who possess both extensive knowledge and broad interests -- are essential to U.S. competitiveness in the future."

The symposium will be held Sept. 21-23 at Ford Research and Innovation Center in Dearborn, Mich., and will examine the nanotechnology-biology interface, intelligent software systems and machines, supply chain management, and personal mobility. Anne L. Stevens, executive vice president and chief operating officer for the Americas, Ford Motor Co., will be a featured speaker. Her responsibilities at Ford have ranged from operating assembly plants to directing product development and manufacturing. Prior to joining Ford, Stevens worked at Exxon Mobil Corp.

The following engineers were selected as general participants: ALEXIS ABRAMSON Case Western Reserve University
STEPHANIE ADAMS, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
DAVID ANDERSON, Georgia Institute of Technology
MARK ANDERSON, University of Wisconsin, Madison
ANA ANTON, North Carolina State University
GEORGE BACHAND, Sandia National Laboratories
QING BAI, Agilent Technologies Inc.
BRADLEY BEBEE, Science Applications International Corp.
CHANDRA BHAT, University of Texas, Austin
STEPHAN BILLER, General Motors Corp.
RICHARD BOGER, ABAQUS Inc.
DAVID BRUEMMER, Idaho National Laboratory
BRYAN CANTRILL, Sun Microsystems Inc.
KIMBERLY CHAFFIN, Medtronic Inc.
JANE CHANG, University of California, Los Angeles
JIA CHEN, IBM Corp.
AREF CHOWDHURY, Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies
ZISSIS DARDAS, United Technologies Research Center
JERRETT DATCHER, Boeing Phantom Works
MOSES DAVID, 3M Co.
MATTHEW DELISA, Cornell University
ANNE DILLON, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
SCOTT DOEBLING, Los Alamos National Laboratory
YE FANG Corning, Inc.
ANDREI FEDOROV, Georgia Institute of Technology
SURESH GARIMELLA, Purdue University
MICHAEL GARVIN, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
IRENE GEORGAKOUDI, Tufts University
CINDIE GIUMMARRA, Alcoa Inc.
ANITA GOEL, Nanobiosym Inc.
CHRISTINE GRANT, North Carolina State University
PAULA HICKS, Cargill Inc.
RON HO, Sun Microsystems Laboratories
MANI JANAKIRAM, Intel Corp.
PAUL JOHNSON, Arizona State University
RUBEN JUANES, University of Texas, Austin
KRISHNA KALYANASUNDARAM, Motorola Inc.
DEEPAK KHOSLA, HRL Laboratories LLC
STEVEN KOU, Columbia University
OLGA KUCHAR, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
DAVID LAVAN, Yale University
PHILIP LEDUC, Carnegie Mellon University
LORRAINE LIN, Bechtel National Inc.
MELISSA LUNDEN, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
TENG MA Florida, State University
SURYA MALLAPRAGADA, Iowa State University
RAJIT MANOHAR, Cornell University
YOKY MATSUOKA, Carnegie Mellon University
LAWRENCE MEGAN, Praxair Inc.
MATTHEW MEHALIK, University of Pittsburgh
NEFAA MEKHILEF, Arkema Inc.
SERGEY MELNIK, Microsoft Research USA
JOSH MOLHO, Caliper Life Sciences
JEFFREY MONTANYE, Dow Chemical Co.
KUMAR MUTHURAMAN, Purdue University
TIMOTHY NOLEN, Eastman Chemical Co.
ERIC OTT, GE - Aviation
JONATHAN PRESTON, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co.
WILLIAM PROVINE, DuPont Co.
ADAM RASHEED, General Electric Global Research
TODD SALAMON, Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies
COREY SCHUMACHER, U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory
KENNETH SHEPARD, Columbia University
AGHIJIT SHEVADE, Jet Propulsion Laboratory
MICHAEL SIEMER, Mydea Technologies Corp.
VIJA SINGH, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
SANJIV SINHA, Environmental Consulting & Technology Inc.
HYONGSOK SOH, University of California, Santa Barbara
MARGARITA THOMPSON, Delphi Corp.
SAMMY TIN, Illinois Institute of Technology
MANUEL TORRES, Science Applications International Corp.
ADITYA TYAGI, CH2M Hill
MICHIEL VAN NIEUWSTADT, Ford Motor Co.
PAVLOS VLACHOS, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
MICHAEL WASHINGTON, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
COLIN WHELAN, Raytheon Co.
CHRISTOPHER WOLVERTON, Ford Motor Co.
GERARD WONG, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
ALEKSEY YEZERETS, Cummins Inc.
CHENGXIANG ZHAI, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
JINGREN ZHOU, Microsoft Research

Speakers at this year's event are: ROBERT AXTELL The Brookings Institution
MATT BARTH, University of California, Riverside
MARCEL BRUCHEZ, Carnegie Mellon University
TIMOTHY DEMING, University of California, Los Angeles
BRENDA DIETRICH, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center
REBEKAH DREZEK, Rice University
MICHAEL JOHNSON, Carnegie Mellon University
RISTO MIIKKULAINEN, University of Texas, Austin
ANDREAS SCHÄFER, University of Cambridge
ANDREAS SCHELL, DaimlerChrysler
ALAN SCHULTZ, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
MORLEY STONE, U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory
MARK WANG, RAND Corp.
LLOYD WATTS, Audience Inc.
SUSAN ZIELINSKI, University of Michigan The organizers of the 2006 symposium are: JULIA PHILLIPS (chair) Sandia National Laboratories
APOORV AGARWAL, Ford Motor Co.
M. BRIAN BLAKE, Georgetown University
TEJAL DESAI, University of California, San Francisco
DAVID FOGEL, Natural Selection Inc.
HIROSHI MATSUI, City University of New York, Hunter College
JENNIFER RYAN, University College Dublin
WILLIAM SCHNEIDER, University of Notre Dame
JULIE SWANN, Georgia Institute of Technology
-end-
Sponsors for the 2006 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering are the Ford Motor Co., the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the U.S. Department of Defense (DDR&E-Research), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the National Science Foundation, Microsoft Corp., Cummins Inc., and numerous individual donors.

The National Academy of Engineering is an independent, nonprofit institution that serves as an adviser to government and the public on issues in engineering and technology. Its members consist of the nation's premier engineers, who are elected by their peers for their distinguished achievements. Established in 1964, NAE operates under the congressional charter granted to the National Academy of Sciences in 1863.

To read more about Frontiers of Engineering, visit the NAE Web site at http://www.nae.edu/frontiers. A meeting program is also available at the site.

[This news release is available at http://www.nae.edu/nae/naehome.nsf/weblinks/CGOZ-6R2K5X?OpenDocument.]

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

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