Nav: Home

New study: LDL quality is a novel, modifiable cardiovascular risk marker

July 11, 2018

Scientists at the Wihuri Research Institute and the University of Helsinki, Finland, developed a method that can be used to monitor the quality of circulating LDL particles by measuring the susceptibility of the LDL particles to aggregate.

The LDL aggregates have a tendency to accumulate in the arterial wall, where they induce the formation of cholesterol-rich plaques. LDL aggregates can also induce local inflammation in the plaques. An inflamed plaque can then rupture and cause myocardial infarction.

The scientists found that LDL isolated from patients with known cardiovascular disease was more aggregation-prone than LDL isolated from healthy individuals. The most aggregation-prone LDL was found in those patients who later died from cardiovascular disease.

"This is the first study to show that there are measurable inter-individual differences in the aggregation susceptibility of LDL particles, and that aggregation-prone LDL is predictive of cardiovascular death", summarizes Dr. Katariina Öörni, who led the research team.

There is also good news: the study showed that the quality of LDL particles can be improved by cholesterol-lowering medication or by healthy diet. "Increase in consumption of vegetable oils and decrease in consumption of sugar decreased LDL aggregation", describes Maija Ruuth, the first author of the research article.

In the future, the new measurement of LDL aggregation may help to improve cardiovascular risk. "This new biomarker may also facilitate identification of patients with currently unrecognized risk for cardiovascular events", suggests Professor Petri Kovanen, a member of the research team.
-end-


University of Helsinki

Related Consumption Articles:

No need to cut down red and processed meat consumption
The researchers performed four systematic reviews focused on randomized controlled trials and observational studies looking at the impact of red meat and processed meat consumption on cardiometabolic and cancer outcomes.
Estimate of cigarette consumption in England
Estimated total cigarette consumption in England fell by almost one-quarter between 2011 and 2018 in a study comparing survey and sales data.
Clarifying the economic value of adjusting the power consumption
The economic value of demand response that adjusts the power consumption has not been clarified.
Estimating microplastic consumption
Since the mass production of plastics began in the 1940s, the versatile polymers have spread rapidly across the globe.
Reducing water consumption in mining
Plenty of water is needed for beneficiation of mineral ores.
More Consumption News and Consumption Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...