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Is facial cosmetic surgery associated with perception changes for attractiveness, masculinity, personality traits in men?

July 11, 2019

What The Study Did: Photographs of 24 men before and after facial cosmetic surgery were part of this survey study to examine whether surgery was associated with perceived changes in attractiveness, masculinity and a variety of personality traits.
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Authors: Michael J. Reilly, M.D., of the Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C., is the corresponding author.

(doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2019.0463)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Media advisory: The full study and podcast are linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamafacialplasticsurgery/fullarticle/2737367?guestAccessKey=307570a1-f555-4f39-90ab-73ea97820b11&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=071119

JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery

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