Nav: Home

Genomic analysis reveals ancient origins of domestic cattle

July 11, 2019

A new genome-wide analysis by Marta Pereira Verdugo and colleagues uncovers the complex origins of domestic cattle (Bos taurus), demonstrating why it has been difficult to untangle these origins from studies of modern breeds. Cattle were first domesticated around 10,500 years ago from the extinct Eurasian auroch, Bos primigenius, in northern Mesopotamia. By comparing the auroch genome to the genomes of 67 ancient Bos taurus specimens from archaeological sites in the Near East, Verdugo et al. conclude that the first domesticated cattle populations had diverse origins among aurochs, with multiple strains of wild auroch contributing to a growing population of domesticated cows. Around 4,000 years ago, Bos taurus populations across the region received a rapid and widespread influx of primarily male genetic material from the zebu (Bos indicus) from the Indus Valley. This genomic shift occurred during a multi-century drought, and the drought-adapted zebu may have been brought into the domesticated cattle populations as a way to keep herds thriving under arid conditions, the researchers say.
-end-


American Association for the Advancement of Science

Related Cattle Articles:

New test detects early stage of wasting disease in cattle
Researchers at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, have identified a more sensitive test for detecting the early stages of paratuberculosis, a fatal disease that plagues dairy herds and causes an estimated annual loss of up to $250 million to the US dairy industry.
Securing the future of cattle production in Africa
A world-first genetic study of cattle in Africa has revealed clues which could help secure the future of meat and dairy production on the continent.
Investigational vaccine protects cattle from respiratory syncytial virus
A novel vaccine developed by scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, protected cattle from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, according to research published online in npj Vaccines on March 8.
Considering cattle could help eliminate malaria in India
The goal of eliminating malaria in countries like India could be more achievable if mosquito-control efforts take into account the relationship between mosquitoes and cattle, according to an international team of researchers.
Certification would ensure quality welfare during cattle transport
Over 530,000 cattle are shipped to slaughter plants each week, making the transport of cattle a vitally important part of the beef and dairy industries.
Reducing ammonia pollution from cattle
Agriculture is responsible for 90% of all ammonia pollution in Europe, a considerable part of which comes from cattle manure management: a new study shows what steps to take to reduce this pollution.
A chromosome anomaly may cause malaria-transmitting mosquito to prefer feeding on cattle
Mosquitoes are more likely to feed on cattle than on humans if they carry a specific chromosomal rearrangement in their genome, reducing their odds of transmitting the malaria parasite, reports Bradley Main at the University of California, Davis in a study published Sept.
Methionine could be key to improving pregnancy rate in dairy cattle
Research at the University of Illinois has shown that adding methionine to the diets of Holstein cows during the prepartum and postpartum periods may impact the preimplantation embryo in a way that enhances its capacity for survival.
Two thirds of cattle attacks on people involve dogs, new study finds
Dog owners are being urged to remember to be vigilant with their pets when walking near cows in the countryside, following a new review into cattle attacks by the University of Liverpool.
Cattle disease spread by vets, not cows, suggests new study
A cattle disease that affected more than 5,000 cows, over 500 of which were killed, was probably spread by vets farmers and cattle traders in Germany, according to one of the first research articles published in the new open access journal Heliyon.

Related Cattle Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#530 Why Aren't We Dead Yet?
We only notice our immune systems when they aren't working properly, or when they're under attack. How does our immune system understand what bits of us are us, and what bits are invading germs and viruses? How different are human immune systems from the immune systems of other creatures? And is the immune system so often the target of sketchy medical advice? Those questions and more, this week in our conversation with author Idan Ben-Barak about his book "Why Aren't We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System".