AOSSM presents prestigious research awards at annual meeting

July 12, 2010

PROVIDENCE, RI - In order to recognize and encourage cutting-edge research in key areas of orthopaedic sports medicine, the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) will present eight research awards and two grants during its Annual Meeting, July 15-18th in Providence, Rhode Island. As a leader in orthopaedic sports medicine, AOSSM annually provides more than $150,000 to research initiatives and projects around the country. Highlights of this year's award recipients include:

2010 Young Investigators Grant
The Young Investigator Grant (YIG) is specifically designed to support young researchers who have not received prior funding. This year's winner, Demetrios Delos, MD, is currently an orthopaedic resident at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. His study will evaluate the effects of platelet rich plasma (PRP), on skeletal muscle healing in the rat, utilizing a validated muscle contusion model. The aims of the study are three-fold (1) Evaluate the contractile and histologic effects of locally administered PRP versus saline versus no injection on skeletal muscle contusion healing; (2) Evaluate the effect of delayed treatment in this model and, (3) Explore the effect of PRP on the post-injury inflammatory response.

2010 Sandy Kirkley Clinical Research Outcome Grant
The Kirkley Grant provides start-up supplemental funding for an outcome research project or pilot study in the amount of $20,000. This year's winner is Daniel B. Whelan, MD, MSc, FRCSC, Assistant Professor for the Division of Orthopedics at St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto. Dr. Whelan's study (EERAADS) is actually the second of a two-stage investigation to evaluate the effectiveness of external rotation (ER) immobilization following first time shoulder dislocations. The ERRAADS trial will attempt to answer the question of whether emergent application (i.e. within hours of dislocation) of an ER brace might be more beneficial. The study will be conducted at a number of Canadian centers.

Aircast Award for Basic Science
Voted by the AOSSM Fellowship Committee, this year's recipients are Frank A. Petrigliano, MD, Volker Musahi, MD, Musa Citak, MD, Eduardo Suero, MD and Andrew Pearle, MD for their paper titled: "The Effect of Meniscal Loss on Knee Stability After Single-Bundle ACL Reconstructions: A Cadaveric Experiment." The study looked at the effects of meniscectomy on knee stability following single-bundle ACL reconstruction as measured by a navigated pivot shift examination.

Aircast Award for Clinical Science
Voted on by the AOSSM's Fellowship Committee, awardees receive $1,500. This year's winners are Jocelyn R. Wittstein, MD, Robin Queen, PhD, Alicia Abbey, BS, ATC, Alison P. Toth, MD and Claude T. Moorman, III, MD for their paper titled: "Subjective Outcomes, Isokinetic Strength, and Endurance Following Biceps Tenotomy versus Tenodesis." The purpose of this study is to determine whether biceps tenotomy (division of a bicep tendon) or biceps tenodesis(moving the attachment of the biceps tendon to a position that is out of the way of the shoulder joint) results in superior subjective outcomes, strength, and endurance.

Cabaud Memorial Award
Given to the best paper researching hard or soft tissue biology, This award is selected by the AOSSM Awards Subcommittee with awardees receiving $500. This year's winner is Volker Musahl, MD of the University of Pittsburgh for his paper, "A Comparison of Single and Double Bundle ACL Reconstructions on Pivot Shift Kinematics in ACL and Meniscus Deficient Knees." Dr. Musahl investigated whether anatomic double bundle ACL reconstruction would better restore knee movement in an ACL/ meniscus injury model when compared to two common single bundle ACL reconstructions.

Excellence in Research Award
This award is selected by the AOSSM Awards Subcommittee with principal investigators receiving $1,000 and $1,500 for the sponsoring institution. Matthew V. Smith, MD of the Washington University is this year's recipient for his paper, "The Effect of Acetabular Labral Tears on Hip Stability and Labral Strain in a Joint Compression Model." Dr. Smith's research analyzes whether in a joint compression model, radial and circumferential acetabular labral tears significantly decrease hip stability and if the tears significantly alter strain patterns in the anterior and anterior-superior acetabular labrum.

O'Donoghue Award.
This award is given to Bruce S. Miller, MD of the University of Michigan for his paper, "When Do Rotator Cuff Repairs Fail? Serial Ultrasound Examination after Arthroscopic Repair of Large and Massive Rotator Cuff Tears." The awardee is selected by the AOSSM Awards Subcommittee with recipients receiving $2,500. Dr. Miller's paper investigates the timing of structural failure of surgically repaired large and massive rotator cuff tears and the association between recurrent tears and clinical outcome after rotator cuff repair.

The NCAA Research Award
This award is given to the best paper submitted that pertains to the health, safety, and well-being of collegiate student-athletes. The award is selected by the AOSSM Awards Subcommittee with awardees receiving $500. This year's awardee is Mark V. Paterno, PT, MS, SCS, ATC, of the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. His paper titled, "Biomechanical Measures during Landing and Postural Stability Predict Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury After ACL Reconstruction and Return to Sport," investigates whether neuromuscular control and postural stability measures after an ACL reconstruction will predict relative increased risk for a second ACL injury.

Hughston Award
This year's recipients of the Hughston Award are K. Donald Shelbourne, MD, and Tinker Gray, MA of the Shelbourne Knee Center, Indianapolis, Indiana. The award is given to the most outstanding paper published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine and is chosen by a panel of AJSM editors and reviewers and receives $5,000. Dr. Shelbourne's paper, "Minimum 10-Year Results After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction How the Loss of Normal Knee Motion Compounds Other Factors Related to the Development of Osteoarthritis After Surgery," discusses whether patients with normal knee motion will have less than normal motion 10-years post ACL reconstruction.

AJSM Systematic Review Award
Verity Pacey, BAS, of the Physiotherapy Department, The Children's Hospital at Westmead in Australia has been given the AJSM Systematic Review Award for her paper, "Generalized Joint Hypermobility and Risk of Lower Limb Joint Injury During Sport, A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis." Ms. Pacey and her team reviewed whether individuals with generalized joint hypermobility (joints that stretch further than normal) have an increased risk of lower limb joint injury when undertaking sporting activities. The winning paper is chosen by a panel of AJSM editors and reviewers and receives $5,000
-end-
For more information on AOSSM research projects and awards please visit www.sportsmed.org and click on the "Research" tab.

The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) is a world leader in sports medicine education, research, communication and fellowship, and includes national and international orthopaedic sports medicine leaders. The Society works closely with many other sports medicine specialists, including athletic trainers, physical therapists, family physicians, and others to improve the identification, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports injuries.

For more information, please contact AOSSM Director of Communications, Lisa Weisenberger, at 847/292-4900 or e-mail her at lisa@aossm.org. Additional information and press releases can be viewed in the newsroom on AOSSM's Web site at www.sportsmed.org

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

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