George to receive GSA's 2010 Distinguished Career Contribution to Gerontology Award

July 12, 2010

The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Linda George, PhD, of Duke University as the 2010 recipient of the Distinguished Career Contribution to Gerontology Award.

This distinguished honor is given annually to an individual whose theoretical contributions have helped bring about a new synthesis and perspective or have yielded original and elegant research designs addressing a significant problem in the literature.

The award presentation will take place at GSA's 63rd Annual Scientific Meeting, which will be held from November 19 to 23, 2010, in New Orleans, LA. This conference is organized to foster interdisciplinary collaboration among researchers, educators, and practitioners who specialize in the study of the aging process. Visit www.geron.org/2010 for further details.

George is a professor of sociology and the associate director of the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development at Duke University.

Her major research interests include social factors and depression; the effects of stress and coping, especially the stress of caring for an impaired family member; the relationship between religion and health; and the effects of beliefs and expectations on health.

She is the author/editor of seven books, more than 200 journal articles, and more than 80 book chapters. George publishes regularly in journals in the areas of aging, psychiatry, and health.

George, a former GSA president, is also a GSA fellow, which represents the Society's highest class of membership. She is a previous winner of GSA's Robert W. Kleemeier Award and Distinguished Mentorship in Gerontology Award.
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The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) is the nation's oldest and largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to research, education, and practice in the field of aging. The principal mission of the Society -- and its 5,200+ members -- is to advance the study of aging and disseminate information among scientists, decision makers, and the general public. GSA's structure also includes a policy institute, the National Academy on an Aging Society, and an educational branch, the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education.

The Gerontological Society of America

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