Health care research: $1.6 million in new funding for University of Montreal

July 12, 2010

Montreal, July 12, 2010 - University of Montreal scientists have received $1.6 in new funding to advance healthcare research over the next three years, as part of a Government of Canada announcement to support 31 research projects at 12 universities across the nation. Some $13 million in funding, from the Collaborative Health Research Projects program, will be awarded over three years to foster collaborations between scientists from the natural, engineering and health sciences.

The Collaborative Health Research Projects program is an initiative of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. At the University of Montreal, the following researchers will obtain funding over the next 36 months:

Philippe Després, a professor at the University of Montreal Department of Physics and a scientist at the Université de Montréal Hospital Research Centre, will receive a $245,100 grant to enable the development an automated blood counter for quantitative molecular imaging. He will lead the project with collaborators Louis-André Hamel and Jean-Pierre Martin of the University of Montreal Department of Physics, as well as Pedro Rosa-Neto of the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and Jean-Paul Soucy of the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital.

Guy Rousseau, a professor at the University of Montreal Department of Pharmacology and a researcher at the Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, will obtain $494,500 in funding to innovate in angioplasty interventions; a technique of widening a narrowed or obstructed blood vessel. He will collaborate with Thierry Charron from the Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal and Aimé Robert Leblanc of the University of Montreal Department of Physiology.

Pierre Thibault, a professor at the University of Montreal Department of Chemistry and a scientist at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC), will receive $441,905 in support to study the histone deacetylase (HDAC) or enzymes that modify newly synthesized histones to improve the therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors and facilitate the development of novel and more specific inhibitors in clinical settings. He will collaborate with Alain Verreault, a professor at the Department of Pathology and Cell Biology who is also an IRIC scientist.

Julian X. Zhu, a professor at the University of Montreal Department of Chemistry and Canada Research Chair in Polymer Biomaterials, will obtain $453,800 to study new polymer resins made from natural compounds for dental applications. The dental resins are based on natural compounds such as bile acids in the body. They are expected to be more biocompatible and less toxic than the dental amalgam that contains mercury or currently used polymer resins containing bis-phenol A, a compound listed by Health Canada as a dangerous substance in 2008. Publication of the first papers on this research and the possible use of natural compounds in dental composites received much media and public attention in 2009. This work will help to get the new resins closer to clinical use. Professor Zhu will collaborate with Professor Daniel Fortin of the University of Montreal Faculty of Dental Medicine and Professor Sophie Lerouge of the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre. They intend to establish industrial collaborations for the formulation and testing of their dental composites.
-end-
On the Web:Media contact:
Sylvain-Jacques Desjardins
International press attaché
University of Montreal
Telephone: 514-343-7593
Email: sylvain-jacques.desjardins@umontreal.ca
UdeM on Twitter: http://twitter.com/umontreal_news

University of Montreal

Related Engineering Articles from Brightsurf:

Re-engineering antibodies for COVID-19
Catholic University of America researcher uses 'in silico' analysis to fast-track passive immunity

Next frontier in bacterial engineering
A new technique overcomes a serious hurdle in the field of bacterial design and engineering.

COVID-19 and the role of tissue engineering
Tissue engineering has a unique set of tools and technologies for developing preventive strategies, diagnostics, and treatments that can play an important role during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Engineering the meniscus
Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions.

Artificially engineering the intestine
Short bowel syndrome is a debilitating condition with few treatment options, and these treatments have limited efficacy.

Reverse engineering the fireworks of life
An interdisciplinary team of Princeton researchers has successfully reverse engineered the components and sequence of events that lead to microtubule branching.

New method for engineering metabolic pathways
Two approaches provide a faster way to create enzymes and analyze their reactions, leading to the design of more complex molecules.

Engineering for high-speed devices
A research team from the University of Delaware has developed cutting-edge technology for photonics devices that could enable faster communications between phones and computers.

Breakthrough in blood vessel engineering
Growing functional blood vessel networks is no easy task. Previously, other groups have made networks that span millimeters in size.

Next-gen batteries possible with new engineering approach
Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to Penn State research, recently published in Nature Energy.

Read More: Engineering News and Engineering Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.