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How to grow a glowing flower: The chemistry of fluorescence (video)

July 12, 2016

WASHINGTON, July 12, 2016 -- If you have ever seen objects "glow" under a black light, you're familiar with fluorescence. But have you ever wondered why some materials fluoresce while others don't? Reactions explains how fluorescence works, along with its importance for applications in forensics, medicine and nanotech. This week, we're also throwing in a bonus video on how to grow a fluorescent flower for that special someone. It's all here in these videos:

How To Grow A Fluorescent Flower: https://youtu.be/c3VVUsuowNM

Fluorescence Is Awesome (Here Is How It Works): https://youtu.be/FZ9E5hZMbCA
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