Nav: Home

Study finds broad range of 'independence' for US young adults

July 12, 2016

The idea of what it means to become "independent" has evolved significantly in recent generations, and new research from North Carolina State University finds that the concept of being either dependent or independent doesn't apply to almost half of young adults in the United States. Instead, the study finds that young adults can fall into any of four categories that span the spectrum from full independence to being wholly dependent on parents.

"It used to be that 'independence' was seen as moving into your own home, and that's not necessarily true anymore," says Anna Manzoni, an assistant professor of sociology at NC State and author of a paper describing the work. "Some people live at home, but are financially independent; other people have their own houses or apartments, but still receive financial support from parents. And whether young people actually consider themselves independent isn't necessarily tied to either circumstance."

For the study, Manzoni looked at data from more than 14,000 young people - aged 18-25 - who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Specifically, Manzoni evaluated various indicators of independence: living arrangements, earnings, financial support from parents, and self-perceptions of independence and adulthood.

Based on that analysis, Manzoni found that young people fell into one of four groups -only one of which had all of the indicators of independence. That "independent" group accounted for 28 percent of young people.

At the other extreme was the "dependent" group, which included people who received financial support from parents and were least likely to live on their own or think of themselves as independent. The dependent group made up 23 percent of young people.

A third group, the "independent non-adults," was made up of people who were independent in terms of the objective residential and financial indicators, but who did not think of themselves as independent adults. Independent non-adults made up 24 percent of young people.

The last group, called "residential dependents," were financially independent and thought of themselves as independent adults, but still lived with their parents. Residential dependents made up 25 percent of young people.

"The fact that we have this diverse range of groups across the spectrum of independence, and that each of these groups is so well-represented in the population, means that we need to stop thinking of independence as a binary concept: either dependent or independent," Manzoni says. "It's more complicated than that. Our research and policies - on everything from education to housing - need to reflect these nuances, because they are important."

The paper, "Conceptualizing and measuring youth independence: A multidimensional approach using latent class analysis," is published in the journal Acta Sociologica.
-end-


North Carolina State University

Related Research Articles:

More Research News and Research Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Mindset
In the past few months, human beings have come together to fight a global threat. This hour, TED speakers explore how our response can be the catalyst to fight another global crisis: climate change. Guests include political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac, diplomat Christiana Figueres, climate justice activist Xiye Bastida, and writer, illustrator, and artist Oliver Jeffers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.