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Regine von Klitzing awarded the EPJ E Pierre-Gilles de Gennes Lecture Prize for 2016

July 12, 2016

The journal EPJ E - Soft Matter and Biological Physics has awarded German physicist Regine von Klitzing the 2016 EPJ E Pierre-Gilles de Gennes Lecture Prize. The journal editors chose von Klitzing for her important contributions to polymer physics, particularly concerning the structure of polyelectrolyte assemblies and functionalized/responsive microgels. Regine von Klitzing is full professor at the Technische Universität Berlin where she directs the Physicochemistry Laboratory for Colloid and Interface Science.

This is the fifth time this prestigious prize, named after the Nobel laureate who founded EPJ E, has been awarded. The EPJ E Pierre-Gilles de Gennes lecture will be delivered by von Klitzing in Grenoble, France, during the 4th International Soft Matter Conference which takes place from 12 to 16 September 2016.

An experimental physicist by training, Regine von Klitzing received her PhD from Mainz University in 1996, performing her PhD thesis work on polyelectrolyte multilayers. She then moved to Bordeaux for her post-doctoral studies at the CNRS-CRPP, working on foam films. In 1998 she started to work on the structuring of polyelectrolytes in thin films and received her habilitation qualification from the Technische Universität Berlin in 2003. She has accepted an offer from the Technische Universität Darmstadt for a full professorship in physics and will start there in March 2017. Regine von Klitzing has become famous for her contributions to the structuring and dynamics of polymers and colloidal dispersions under geometrical confinement.

The EPJ E Pierre-Gilles de Gennes Lecture Prize is sponsored by the European Physical Journal (EPJ) co-publishers, which consist of the Italian Physical Society (SIF) and the publishers EDP Sciences and Springer. It is awarded to outstanding scientists for their contribution to soft matter research. Previous recipients of this prize are Sam Safran, Mike Cates, Julia Yeomans and Ludwik Leibler.

The European Physical Journal E publishes papers describing advances in the understanding of physical aspects of soft matter and biological systems. This includes reports of experimental, computational and theoretical studies and appeals to the broad interdisciplinary communities including physics, chemistry, biology and materials science.
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The European Physical Journals are international peer-reviewed publications covering the whole spectrum of pure and applied physics, including related interdisciplinary subjects. They are a continuation of Acta Physica Hungarica, Anales de Fisica, Czechoslovak Journal of Physics, Fizika A, Il Nuovo Cimento, Journal de Physique, Portugaliae Physica and Zeitschrift für Physik.

Springer is part of Springer Nature, a leading global research, educational and professional publisher, home to an array of respected and trusted brands providing quality content through a range of innovative products and services. Springer Nature is the world's largest academic book publisher, publisher of the world's most influential journals and a pioneer in the field of open research. The company numbers almost 13,000 staff in over 50 countries. Springer Nature was formed in 2015 through the merger of Nature Publishing Group, Palgrave Macmillan, Macmillan Education and Springer Science+Business Media. Visit http://www.springernature.com follow @SpringerNature.

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