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New neurons archive old memories

July 12, 2018

The ability to obtain new memories in adulthood may depend on neurogenesis -- the generation of new neurons in the hippocampus -- to clear out old memories that have been safely stored in the cortex, according to research in male rats published in JNeurosci.

Previous research suggests that the hippocampus has a finite capacity to acquire and store new memories. It is unknown how the brain compensates for this limitation to facilitate learning throughout life.

Kaoru Inokuchi and colleagues show that reducing neurogenesis in rats impairs recovery of learning capacity while promoting neurogenesis through physical activity on a running wheel increased hippocampal capacity. This finding implies that neurogenesis, which can be reduced by stress and aging, underlies the brain's capacity for new memories. The study may also explain why exercise is especially important for patients with memory disorders such as Alzheimer's disease as well as for healthy people to help maintain memory as they age.
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Article: Adult Neurogenesis Conserves Hippocampal Memory Capacity
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2796-17.2018
Corresponding author: Kaoru Inokuchi (University of Toyama, Japan), inokuchi@med.u-toyama.ac.jp

About JNeurosci

JNeurosci, the Society for Neuroscience's first journal, was launched in 1981 as a means to communicate the findings of the highest quality neuroscience research to the growing field. Today, the journal remains committed to publishing cutting-edge neuroscience that will have an immediate and lasting scientific impact, while responding to authors' changing publishing needs, representing breadth of the field and diversity in authorship.

About The Society for Neuroscience

The Society for Neuroscience is the world's largest organization of scientists and physicians devoted to understanding the brain and nervous system. The nonprofit organization, founded in 1969, now has nearly 37,000 members in more than 90 countries and over 130 chapters worldwide.

Society for Neuroscience

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