Nav: Home

Subaru Telescope helps pinpoint origin of ultra-high energy neutrino

July 12, 2018

Today, an international team announced that for the first time in the world they had identified the source object of an ultra-high energy neutrino.

On September 22, 2017 the IceCube experiment at Amundsen Scott station in Antarctica detected an ultra-high energy neutrino coming from outer space and was able to determine the direction it came from to within about 1 degree using the system developed by researchers at Chiba University. While narrow compared to the entire sky, 1 degree still contains many possible candidates for the source object.

OISTER, a network of Japanese university telescopes, collaborating with the 8-m Subaru Telescope in Hawai?i, performed follow-up observations to determine the source of this enigmatic neutrino. They found that an object named TXS 0506+056 was acting peculiarly: shining 3 times brighter than normal and fluctuating more than usual. TXS 0506+056 is a blazer, superheated matter releasing abundant radiation as it slowly spirals down into a supermassive black hole. A quick calculation showed that the odds of two freak occurrences (the ultra-high energy neutrino and a flaring blazer) occurring so close together in time and space by pure chance is effectively zero, unless the two phenomena are related. Therefore TXS 0506+056 must be the source object of the neutrino.

Prof. Michitoshi Yoshida, the Director of Subaru Telescope comments, "We congratulate all members of the IceCube and OISTER teams on this important discovery. We are proud that the Subaru Telescope with its deep observation capability could play a small role in this discovery. In this era of multi-messenger astronomy, collaboration between different observing facilities will be increasingly important. We look forward to working with this team more in the future."
-end-


National Institutes of Natural Sciences

Related Supermassive Black Hole Articles:

Extremely fine measurements of motion in orbiting supermassive black holes
After 12 years observing black holes at the center of an amalgam of ancient galaxies, a multi-institution team, including Stanford's Roger Romani, may have recorded the smallest-ever movement of an object across the sky.
Astronomers detect orbital motion in pair of supermassive black holes
Images made with the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array detect the orbital motion of two supermassive black holes as they circle each other at the center of a distant galaxy.
Groundbreaking discovery confirms existence of orbiting supermassive black holes
For the first time ever, astronomers at The University of New Mexico say they've been able to observe and measure the orbital motion between two supermassive black holes hundreds of millions of light years from Earth -- a discovery more than a decade in the making.
VLA reveals new object near supermassive black hole in famous galaxy
When astronomers took a new look at a famous galaxy with the upgraded Very Large Array, they were surprised by the appearance of a new, bright object that had not appeared in previous images.
Supermassive black holes found in 2 tiny galaxies
U astronomers and colleagues have found two ultra-compact dwarf galaxies with supermassive black holes, the second and third such galaxies found to harbor the objects.
Stars born in winds from supermassive black holes
Observations using ESO's Very Large Telescope have revealed stars forming within powerful outflows of material blasted out from supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies.
Hubble detects supermassive black hole kicked out of galactic core
An international team of astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the centre of the distant galaxy 3C186.
Breaking the supermassive black hole speed limit
A new computer simulation helps explain the existence of puzzling supermassive black holes observed in the early universe.
New model explains the formation of supermassive black holes in the very early universe
Simulations performed using supercomputers demonstrate that the radiation from nearby galaxies can facilitate the formation of supermassive black hole seeds in nearby gas clouds.
Changes of supermassive black hole in the center of NGC 2617 galaxy
Scientists have been studying changes in the appearance of emission from around the supermassive black hole in the center of a galaxy known to astronomers as NGC 2617.

Related Supermassive Black Hole Reading:

The Edge of Infinity: Supermassive Black Holes in the Universe
by Fulvio Melia (Author)

The Galactic Supermassive Black Hole
by Fulvio Melia (Author)

Supermassive Black Holes and their host Galaxies: A coevolution overview across cosmic times
by Rossella Aversa (Author)

Supermassive Black Holes
by Minas Kafatos (Editor)

Focus On: Black Holes: Wormhole, Quasar, Supermassive black Hole, Gravitational Wave, Hawking Radiation, Gravitational Singularity, Schwarzschild Radius, ... Hole, Black hole information Paradox, etc.
by Focus On

Exploring Black Holes (Searchlight Books)
by Laura Hamilton Waxman (Author)

Measuring the Angular Momentum of Supermassive Black Holes (SpringerBriefs in Astronomy)
by Laura Brenneman (Author)

Black Holes : Just Facts For Kids

Sonny Starr Versus The Supermassive Black Hole (The Starr Chronicles Book 2)

From the Mind of the Supermassive Black Hole
by Dr Nadine Judith Lynch Phd (Author)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Dying Well
Is there a way to talk about death candidly, without fear ... and even with humor? How can we best prepare for it with those we love? This hour, TED speakers explore the beauty of life ... and death. Guests include lawyer Jason Rosenthal, humorist Emily Levine, banker and travel blogger Michelle Knox, mortician Caitlin Doughty, and entrepreneur Lux Narayan.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#491 Frankenstein LIVES
Two hundred years ago, Mary Shelley gave us a legendary monster, shaping science fiction for good. Thanks to her, the name of Frankenstein is now famous world-wide. But who was the real monster here? The creation? Or the scientist that put him together? Tune in to a live show from Dragon Con 2018 in Atlanta, as we breakdown the science of Frankenstein, complete with grave robbing and rivers of maggots. Featuring Tina Saey, Lucas Hernandez, Travor Valle, and Nancy Miorelli. Moderated by our own Bethany Brookshire. Related links: Scientists successfully transplant lab-grown lungs into pigs, by Maria Temming on Science...