#BeatEngland, beat sunburn

July 12, 2019

UV detection stickers trialled by Queensland University of Technology (QUT) researchers at the November 2017 Ashes Test at the Gabba have scored with cricket fans.

The stickers, some of which were tagged with Cricket Australia's official 2017 campaign hashtag #BeatEngland, contained UV-sensitive ink which changes colour to warn people when the effect of their sunscreen is wearing off and it needs to be reapplied.

Among study participants who received the stickers, 80 per cent were prompted to reapply protective sunscreen and 86 per cent said they'd like to see stickers included with tickets to outdoor events.Dr Hacker said most of the study participants had very fair or fair skin (63 per cent) and the majority were men (72 per cent).

"Adherence was high among those given the UV detection stickers, with 95 per cent of people using them," Dr Hacker said.

"And 80 per cent of this group reported that they had reapplied sunscreen during the day. That compares to 68 per cent in the control group who didn't have the stickers.

"So the results tell us that the stickers are effective reminders to reapply sunscreen throughout the day when people are outside for long periods of time in Queensland, where we have one of world's highest incidences of melanoma.

"The high rate of use of the stickers indicates this type of technology resonated with people. The stickers are small, simple to use and provide personalised information."

Dr Hacker said while the stickers were effective as a reminder, 41 of all study participants did report a mild sunburn mostly on their face and neck. Most of these people said they had applied and reapplied their sunscreen.

"This suggests that perhaps people may not have applied enough sunscreen or did not apply it in a way that gave them full protection from sunburn," she said.

"Previous studies have shown that people sometimes apply only half the recommended thickness to cover the skin.

"This is something to look at in future studies. Perhaps more public information campaigns on sunscreen amount and application technique are needed."

High school physical education teacher Shaun Griggs, 53, was among the cricket fans who participated in the study.

"I am your typical red hair equals fair skin, and I think anything that makes people more aware of sun safety, especially when you are outside all day, is a great idea," he said.

"I had prepared for the cricket. I had a hat, sunglasses and sunscreen and had chosen to sit under cover. I had the UV detection sticker on the back of my hand and when it changed colour it reminded me to put on more sunscreen.

"I teach sun safety to my students, so I am keen to share the results of this study with them."

CEO of Cricket Australia Kevin Roberts said safety is a "key priority" for cricketers at all levels of the game.

"Exposure to the sun for long periods of time is a reality for players and fans," he said.

"To have partnered with QUT to understand how we can enable better guidance on sunscreen use is an important and innovative public health advancement."

The study, UV detection stickers can assist people to reapply sunscreen, is published in Preventive Medicine.

The SPOTMYUV stickers used in the trial were a prototype provided by the maker. The stickers are now commercially available.
-end-


Queensland University of Technology

Related Health Articles from Brightsurf:

The mental health impact of pandemics for front line health care staff
New research shows the impact that pandemics have on the mental health of front-line health care staff.

Modifiable health risks linked to more than $730 billion in US health care costs
Modifiable health risks, such as obesity, high blood pressure, and smoking, were linked to over $730 billion in health care spending in the US in 2016, according to a study published in The Lancet Public Health.

New measure of social determinants of health may improve cardiovascular health assessment
The authors of this study developed a single risk score derived from multiple social determinants of health that predicts county-level cardiovascular disease mortality.

BU study: High deductible health plans are widening racial health gaps
The growing Black Lives Matter movement has brought more attention to the myriad structures that reinforce racial inequities, in everything from policing to hiring to maternal mortality.

Electronic health information exchange improves public health disease reporting
Disease tracking is an important area of focus for health departments in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

E-health resource improves men's health behaviours with or without fitness facilities
Men who regularly used a free web resource made significantly more health changes than men who did not, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia and Intensions Consulting.

Mental health outcomes among health care workers during COVID-19 pandemic in Italy
Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety and insomnia among health care workers in Italy during the COVID-19 pandemic are reported in this observational study.

Mental health of health care workers in china in hospitals with patients with COVID-19
This survey study of almost 1,300 health care workers in China at 34 hospitals equipped with fever clinics or wards for patients with COVID-19 reports on their mental health outcomes, including symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia and distress.

Health records pin broad set of health risks on genetic premutation
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Marshfield Clinic have found that there may be a much broader health risk to carriers of the FMR1 premutation, with potentially dozens of clinical conditions that can be ascribed directly to carrying it.

Attitudes about health affect how older adults engage with negative health news
To get older adults to pay attention to important health information, preface it with the good news about their health.

Read More: Health News and Health Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.