Albert Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research announced

July 13, 2005

(Bethesda, Maryland, July 12, 2005) -- The National Foundation for Cancer Research today announced a new science prize to honor Nobel-laureate, Dr. Albert Szent- Györgyi. The Albert Szent- Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research, a bi-annual $25,000 cash prize, will be awarded to a scientist whose research has made significant advances in the field of cancer research.

In keeping with Dr. Szent-Györgyi's belief that one must fundamentally understand cancer in order to cure it, the Albert Szent- Györgyi Prize is designed to honor outstanding scientific achievement in the war against cancer while celebrating and recognizing leading researchers who are making extraordinary contributions in the field of cancer research. It is also intended to promote public awareness of the importance of basic science cancer research and encourage increased investment in the resources needed to accelerate progress in cancer research.

Named after Albert Szent-Györgyi, M.D., Ph.D.--recipient of the 1937 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine for his study on Vitamin C and cell respiration--this award embraces and extends his vision of pursuing a cure for cancer by encouraging scientific innovation and fostering collaboration. Dr. Szent-Györgyi was a pioneer who, with Franklin C. Salisbury, co-founded the National Foundation for Cancer Research to provide scientists the financial support necessary to pursue novel cancer research ideas. Their effort and vision has now led to directing more than $210 million in support of basic science cancer research and prevention education from the general public.

"The investment in cancer research over the last 30 years has already paid off for millions of cancer survivors worldwide as we continue to proceed in our understanding and abilities to fight cancer. But the toll on human life is still too great," said Dr. Daniel Von Hoff, chairman of the Szent-Györgyi Prize Committee. "With an aging population in America, the time is now to raise the awareness of the need to expand our support of basic science cancer research, where the true discoveries are being made that will ultimately impact patients."

Nominations for the Szent-Györgyi Prize may be submitted by any scientist, business executive or member of the academic community uniquely familiar with the nominee and/or the work they are nominating the individual for. However, self-nominations will not be accepted. Recipients will have made discoveries resulting in, or leading toward, notable contributions to cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.
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For additional information and to download an application, visit www.NFCR.org/Prize or call the National Foundation for Cancer Research at 301-654-1250. Deadline for nominations is September 1, 2005.

About NFCR

Since its founding, the NFCR has spent more than $210 million funding basic science cancer research and prevention education focused on understanding how and why cells become cancerous. NFCR is dedicated to funding scientists who are discovering cancer's molecular mysteries and translating these discoveries into therapies that hold the hope for curing cancer.

NFCR has established a powerful collaborative network of nine research centers and more than 30 laboratories around the world in the fight against cancer, so that scientists can better work together, sharing knowledge and accelerating discoveries from the bench to the patient's bedside. NFCR is "Research for a Cure". For more visit www.NFCR.org or call (800) 321-CURE.

National Foundation for Cancer Research

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