Promising medical trainees receive funding to pursue research in hematology

July 13, 2009

(WASHINGTON, July 13, 2009) - The American Society of Hematology (ASH) announces the 2009 recipients of its Trainee Research Awards. Through this program, which is designed to encourage the pursuit of research and spark an interest in hematology, 40 medical students, undergraduates, and residents will each receive $4,000 to conduct research on blood and blood-related diseases.

In addition, each award winner is provided with travel stipends to attend the ASH annual meeting, one of the largest medical meetings in the country. The meeting, held each December, provides important opportunities to meet other researchers as well as hear the latest scientific developments in the specialty.

Since 1995, Trainee Research Awards have supported more than 600 trainees early in their scientific careers. The funding is distributed through hematology training programs at the awardees' institutions and supports three-month-long projects in laboratory research or clinical investigation.

The 2009 ASH Trainee Research Award recipients are:
-end-
The ASH Trainee Research Award is offered to institutions in the United States, Mexico, and Canada.

Reporter inquires may be directed to Patrick C. Irelan, ASH Communications Assistant, at pirelan@hematology.org.

The American Society of Hematology (www.hematology.org) is the world's largest professional society concerned with the causes and treatment of blood disorders. Its mission is to further the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disorders affecting blood, bone marrow, and the immunologic, hemostatic, and vascular systems, by promoting research, clinical care, education, training, and advocacy in hematology. In September, ASH launched Blood: The Vital Connection (www.bloodthevitalconnection.org), a credible online resource addressing bleeding and clotting disorders, anemia, and cancer. It provides hematologist-approved information about these common blood conditions including risk factors, preventive measures, and treatment options.

American Society of Hematology

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