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NASA finds fragmented remnants of Beryl, located west of Bermuda

July 13, 2018

The remnants of former Tropical Storm Beryl are being battered by upper level winds, and that's fragmenting them even more. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the northwestern Atlantic Ocean and found some of those scattered thunderstorms were strong.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Beryl's remnants on July 13 at 2:05 a.m. EDT (0605 UTC) and analyzed the storm in infrared light. Infrared light provides temperature data and that's important when trying to understand how strong storms can be. The higher the cloud tops, the colder and the stronger they are.

NASA's Aqua satellite identified a few scattered storms with coldest cloud top temperatures near minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit/minus 53 degrees Celsius). Storms with cloud top temperatures that cold have the capability to produce heavy rainfall.

On July 13 at 8 a.m. EDT, the National Hurricane Center noted "An area of low pressure, associated with the remnants of Beryl, is located about 300 miles west of Bermuda. The associated shower and thunderstorm activity remains disorganized due to strong upper-level winds. These winds are expected to become even less conducive for subtropical or tropical development over the next day or two while the low moves north-northeastward at about 10 mph, and additional development will be limited once the low reaches colder waters by Saturday night, July 14 or Sunday, July 15.

The formation chance through five days is now low because of the upper level winds.
-end-
For updated forecasts, visit: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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