Electronic surveillance in couple relationships

July 13, 2020

New Rochelle, NY, July 13, 2020--Impaired intimacy, satisfaction, and infidelity in a romantic relationship can fuel Interpersonal Electronic Surveillance (IES). IES may become the preferred method for resolving relationship issues, rather than direct communication, further reducing trust and intimacy, according to the peer-reviewed journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. Click here to read the article now.

Online surveillance in relationships is a common phenomenon. Lead author Katherine Hertlein, PhD, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, identified the individual, relationship, and technological factors for predicting IES in romantic relationships.

"Partners may justify IES to answer questions about the relationship, enact fewer strategies to be vulnerable with one another, and increase the normalization of strategies that avoid honest, authentic conversation in interpersonal relationships," she says.

"As social networking sites have evolved, so has the ease of surveillance. Once partners reach an impasse in communication, therapists can play an important role in guiding the process of open communication and expression of emotions, allowing for empathy and healing to occur," says Editor-in-Chief Brenda K. Wiederhold, PhD, MBA, BCB, BCN, Interactive Media Institute, San Diego, California and Virtual Reality Medical Institute, Brussels, Belgium.
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About the Journal

Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly online with Open Access options and in print that explores the psychological and social issues surrounding the Internet and interactive technologies. Complete tables of contents and a sample issue may be viewed on the website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research. A complete list of the firm's 90 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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