National Corn Growers Association announces valuable maize genome data now available to scientists

July 14, 2004

ST. LOUIS, Mo., July 13, 2004 - Valuable maize (corn) research is now available to research scientists working to sequence the maize genome, the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) announced today. Ceres, Inc., Monsanto Company, and DuPont subsidiary Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., have transferred their maize sequencing information to a searchable database on the Internet hosted at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center.

After completing a licensing agreement downloadable on the NCGA Web site at www.ncga.com, scientists can access the research at www.maizeseq.org.

"Access to these gene sequences will help public-sector researchers more quickly develop corn plants with improved agronomic performance and profitable quality traits," said Patrick Schnable, professor and director of the Center for Plant Genomics and past chair, Maize Genetics Executive Committee.

In March, NCGA announced the three industry leaders would share their corn genome sequence data, which combined with the corn sequence data already in the public domain will significantly accelerate the identification of genes within the entire corn genome.

This project underscores NCGA's continued commitment to advancements through research. NCGA took a leading role in getting the Plant Genome Initiative signed into law in 1997 and continues to support this important effort. With the availability of sequencing data from Ceres, DuPont and Monsanto, the corn genome could be completely sequenced by 2007, potentially years ahead of when it would have been completed without this initiative.

The NCGA's mission is to create and increase opportunities for corn growers in a changing world and to enhance corn's profitability and usage. NCGA represents more than 33,000 members, 25 affiliated state corn grower organizations and hundreds of thousands of growers who contribute to state checkoff programs.

Founded in 1998, the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center is a not-for-profit institute with a global vision to improve the human condition through basic plant research. Please visit www.danforthcenter.org for additional information.

Ceres, Inc. is a privately held biotechnology company utilizing multiple integrated plant genomics technologies to develop innovative products. For more information on Ceres, see: www.ceresbiotechnology.com

Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., a subsidiary of DuPont, is the world's leading source of customized solutions for farmers, livestock producers, and grain and oilseed processors. DuPont is a science company, delivering science-based solutions in food and nutrition, health care, apparel, home and construction, electronics and transportation that make a difference in people's lives.

Monsanto Company (NYSE: MON) is a leading global provider of technology-based solutions and agricultural products that improve farm productivity and food quality. For more information on Monsanto, see: www.monsanto.com.
-end-


DuPont

Related Corn Articles from Brightsurf:

Making sense of a universe of corn genetics
A new study details the latest efforts to predict traits in corn based on genomics and data analytics.

Redefining drought in the US corn belt
As the climate trends warmer and drier, global food security increasingly hinges on crops' ability to withstand drought.

Speedy recovery: New corn performs better in cold
Around the world, each person eats an average of 70 pounds of corn each year, with even more grown for animal feed and biofuel.

US corn yields get boost from a global warming 'hole'
The global average temperature has increased 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit over the last 100 years.

Genetic discovery may improve corn quality, yields
Researchers may be able to improve corn yields and nutritional value after discovering genetic regulators that synthesize starch and protein in the widely eaten grain, according to a Rutgers-led study.

Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn
Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn, according to Rutgers-led research that helps explain the genetic instability in certain strains and may lead to better breeding of corn and other crops.

Fungal mating: Next weapon against corn aflatoxin?
Native fungi combinations show promise against aflatoxin.

Scientists discover new 'architecture' in corn
New research on the US's most economically important agricultural plant -- corn -- has revealed a different internal structure of the plant than previously thought, which can help optimize how corn is converted into ethanol.

Breeding corn for water-use efficiency may have just gotten easier
With approximately 80 percent of our nation's water supply going towards agriculture, it's fair to say it takes a lot of water to grow crops.

Changing temperatures are helping corn production in US -- for now
Increased production of corn in the US has largely been credited to advances in farming technology but new research shows that changing temperatures play a significant role in crop yield.

Read More: Corn News and Corn Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.