Rush University Medical Center maintains Magnet status for quality nursing

July 14, 2006

Rush University Medical Center has received renewal of its Magnet status, the highest recognition given for nursing excellence. The designation recognizes Rush nursing staff for overall excellence and for providing the very best care to patients. The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program first awarded Rush the four-year Magnet designation in 2002.

Fewer than 50 hospitals in the United States have received Magnet designation twice.

Hospitals that receive Magnet status are noteworthy for their excellence and innovation in nursing, and evidence suggests that organizations with these characteristics deliver better patient outcomes than non-Magnet organizations. Independent studies of Magnet hospitals have shown that they have shorter lengths of patient stays, higher rates of patient satisfaction, increased time spent with patients, lower patient mortality rates, and increased nurse retention rates.

"Receiving Magnet designation again is a testament that our nursing staff continues to provide the very best care to our patients," said Dr. Larry Goodman, president and CEO of Rush. "On behalf of everyone at the medical center, we congratulate the nursing staff on this tremendous achievement and thank them for the hard work they've done to earn it."

To earn Magnet status, organizations undergo a vigorous, multi-faceted evaluation. The Magnet appraisal team interviewed more than 350 members of the Rush staff and visited 37 locations, including all nursing units, during a site visit held from April 3 to 6.

The team evaluated Rush's nursing standards with regard to improving the quality of patient care, providing for patient safety, improving patient satisfaction, and improving the work environment in terms of reducing turnover. The review also considered patient complaints and Rush's standing with professional regulatory organizations.

Beverly Hancock, MS, RN, education/quality coordinator in the department of Nursing Systems headed the ten-member committee that prepared the 2,500-page application for the Magnet designation and accommodated the site visit. Representatives from each of the nursing units also contributed to the process, which began more than a year ago.

"To reapply for and receive Magnet status for an additional four years is confirmation of Rush's resolve to deliver the highest level of care in nursing today," said Hancock. "Retaining our Magnet status is a crucial part of fulfilling Rush's vision of being the medical center of choice in the Chicagoarea."

The concept of a "magnet" hospital for nursing services was initially developed in the 1980s and refers to institutions that attract and retain highly skilled nurses and foster an environment that promotes quality patient care. In all, a little more than 200 hospitals out of approximately 5,000 hospitals nationwide have been awarded Magnet designation since the program was formally established in 1993.

"Everyday our nursing staff demonstrates excellence in patient care with their expertise, compassion, and dedication," said Jane Llewellyn, DNSc, RN, vice president of nursing at Rush. "Magnet status gives patients another reason to choose Rush by showing them they can rely on our nursing staff for the high level of care they need."
-end-


Rush University Medical Center

Related Nursing Articles from Brightsurf:

Dismantling structural racism in nursing
Confronting the uncomfortable reality of systemic racism - the system that creates and maintains racial inequality in every facet of life for people of color - is having a national heyday.

MU School of Nursing programs help nursing homes respond to COVID-19
As the coronavirus pandemic continues to put a strain on health care systems, nursing homes have become overburdened with the challenge of keeping both patients and staff safe and healthy.

Palliative nursing's role during COVID-19 and beyond
As a rapid influx of patients overwhelmed health systems during the coronavirus pandemic, palliative nurses played dual roles supporting patients, patient families, and colleagues.

Calling for nursing support amid COVID-19 pandemic
There are close to 28 million nurses around the world who comprise a global workforce that delivers about 90 percent of primary healthcare, including frontline response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Nursing research informs response to COVID-19 pandemic
Nursing research has an important influence on evidence-based health care practice, care delivery, and policy.

Designing better nursing care with robots
Robots are becoming an increasingly important part of human care, according to researchers based in Japan.

A work patch for better nursing home care
A research team, including a Purdue University work-life balance expert, studied work schedules in nursing home facilities and found a patching approach could benefit patients and staff.

Nursing science could help reduce firearm violence and its impact
Firearm violence is a significant public health problem worldwide. In the United States, firearms are used to kill almost 100 people daily.

A nursing perspective on the opioid crisis
Addictions nursing specialists have a unique role to play in caring for patients, families, and communities affected by the crisis.

Nursing notes can help indicate whether ICU patients will survive
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have found that sentiments in the nursing notes of health care providers are good indicators of whether intensive care unit (ICU) patients will survive.

Read More: Nursing News and Nursing Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.