American Society for Microbiology honors Gary M. Dunny

July 14, 2008

Washington, DC--May 28, 2008--The 2008 American Society for Microbiology (ASM) ASM Graduate Microbiology Teaching Award is being presented to Gary M. Dunny, Professor of Microbiology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. This award recognizes distinguished teaching of microbiology and mentoring of students at the graduate and postgraduate levels.

Dr. Dunny is a dedicated, dynamic teacher who has prepared many students for productive careers in the field of microbiology. Colleagues and students describe him as an outstanding mentor, advocate, and role model who approaches his teaching responsibilities - in the classroom and in the laboratory - with exceptional creativity, thoughtfulness, and commitment. Dr. Dunny's research achievements include development of the well-known pheromone quorum sensing system in Enterococcus faecalis. He also has generated groundbreaking work on pathogenic factors necessary for enterococcal endocarditis.

Dr. Dunny earned his B.S. in Cellular Biology and his Ph.D. in Microbiology at the University of Michigan.

The ASM Graduate Microbiology Teaching Award will be presented during the 108th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), June 1 - June 5, 2008 in Boston, Massachusetts. ASM is the world's oldest and largest life science organization and has more than 43,000 members worldwide. ASM's mission is to advance the microbiological sciences and promote the use of scientific knowledge for improved health and economic and environmental well-being.
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American Society for Microbiology

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