Studies show that diabetes increases risk of tuberculosis

July 14, 2008

Taken together, studies show that diabetes increases risk of tuberculosis

People with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB), according to an analysis published in PLoS Medicine.

Searching for research over the past four decades containing data on the relationship between diabetes and TB, Christie Jeon and Megan Murray of the Harvard School of Public Health identified 13 studies involving more than 1.7 million participants, including 17,698 cases of TB. Combining the data from cohort studies in particular, the researchers calculated that diabetes increases the risk of active TB by about a factor of three.

A three-fold increased risk suggests that diabetes may already be responsible for more than 10% of TB cases in India and China. If these findings are replicated in other countries, global TB control might benefit from special attention to people with diabetes when identifying and treating latent TB. Increased efforts to diagnose and treat diabetes might also decrease the global burden of TB, which kills about 1.6 million people each year.

Citation: Jeon CY, Murray MB (2008) Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of active tuberculosis: A systematic review of 13 observational studies. PLoS Med 5(7): e152. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0050152.

IN YOUR ARTICLE, PLEASE LINK TO THIS URL, WHICH WILL PROVIDE ACCESS TO THE PUBLISHED PAPER: http://medicine.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pmed.0050152

PRESS-ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/plme-05-07-jeon.pdf

CONTACT:
Christie Jeon
Harvard School of Public Health
Department of Epidemiology
Boston, MA 02115
United States of America
+1 617 894 8557
+1 617 566 7805 (fax)
chjeon@hsph.harvard.edu




ALSO PUBLISHED THIS WEEK IN THE PLoS MEDICINE MAGAZINE SECTION

PLoS Medicine editors applaud new law on accessibility of clinical trials results

An editorial published this week in PLoS Medicine hails the US FDA Amendments Act of 2007 as a major step towards open access to results of all clinical trials. The new law, which takes effect in September 2008, will require researchers and trial sponsors to post the results of clinical trials on a publicly accessible Internet site, whether or not the results have been published in a journal. However, the law is only relevant to studies which fall under the FDA's mandate, therefore it mainly applies to trials done in order to gain regulatory approval for drugs or devices in the US. Phase 1 trials and many device trials are also excluded from the new legislation.

The editorial highlights important initiatives in the first half of 2008 by high-profile research organizations in Canada, Europe and the USA in support of open access repositories and comments that "the new law is innovative in bridging the gap between a clinical trial's registration at inception (now an established requirement for publication) and the public archiving of its final peer-reviewed report".

While the editors at PLoS Medicine anticipate challenges ahead, including how to maintain the integrity of data and interpretations posted without traditional peer review, they urge other journals to support public access to clinical trials results. They also urge journals to partake in "an international dialogue of constituencies interested in results reporting" with the goal of "contributing toward the development of international standards for results disclosure" as advocated by the PROCTOR group (Public Reporting of Clinical Trials Outcomes and Results) convened by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Citation: The PLoS Medicine Editors (2008) Next stop, don't block the doors: Opening up access to clinical trials results. PLoS Med 5(7): e160. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0050160

IN YOUR ARTICLE, PLEASE LINK TO THIS URL, WHICH WILL PROVIDE ACCESS TO THE PUBLISHED PAPER: http://medicine.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pmed.0050160

PRESS-ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/plme-05-07-editorial.pdf

CONTACT:
PLoS Medicine Editors
Medicine_editors@plos.org
-end-


PLOS

Related Diabetes Articles from Brightsurf:

New diabetes medication reduced heart event risk in those with diabetes and kidney disease
Sotagliflozin - a type of medication known as an SGLT2 inhibitor primarily prescribed for Type 2 diabetes - reduces the risk of adverse cardiovascular events for patients with diabetes and kidney disease.

Diabetes drug boosts survival in patients with type 2 diabetes and COVID-19 pneumonia
Sitagliptin, a drug to lower blood sugar in type 2 diabetes, also improves survival in diabetic patients hospitalized with COVID-19, suggests a multicenter observational study in Italy.

Making sense of diabetes
Throughout her 38-year nursing career, Laurel Despins has progressed from a bedside nurse to a clinical nurse specialist and has worked in medical, surgical and cardiac intensive care units.

Helping teens with type 1 diabetes improve diabetes control with MyDiaText
Adolescence is a difficult period of development, made more complex for those with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).

Diabetes-in-a-dish model uncovers new insights into the cause of type 2 diabetes
Researchers have developed a novel 'disease-in-a-dish' model to study the basic molecular factors that lead to the development of type 2 diabetes, uncovering the potential existence of major signaling defects both inside and outside of the classical insulin signaling cascade, and providing new perspectives on the mechanisms behind insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes and possibly opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics for the disease.

Tele-diabetes to manage new-onset diabetes during COVID-19 pandemic
Two new case studies highlight the use of tele-diabetes to manage new-onset type 1 diabetes in an adult and an infant during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Genetic profile may predict type 2 diabetes risk among women with gestational diabetes
Women who go on to develop type 2 diabetes after having gestational, or pregnancy-related, diabetes are more likely to have particular genetic profiles, suggests an analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.

Maternal gestational diabetes linked to diabetes in children
Children and youth of mothers who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy are at increased risk of diabetes themselves, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Two diabetes medications don't slow progression of type 2 diabetes in youth
In youth with impaired glucose tolerance or recent-onset type 2 diabetes, neither initial treatment with long-acting insulin followed by the drug metformin, nor metformin alone preserved the body's ability to make insulin, according to results published online June 25 in Diabetes Care.

People with diabetes visit the dentist less frequently despite link between diabetes, oral health
Adults with diabetes are less likely to visit the dentist than people with prediabetes or without diabetes, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and East Carolina University's Brody School of Medicine.

Read More: Diabetes News and Diabetes Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.