SNM awards $300,000 to support molecular imaging research

July 14, 2008

RESTON, Va.--SNM--an international scientific and professional organization of more than 16,000 members dedicated to promoting the practical applications, technology and science of molecular imaging and nuclear medicine--has awarded $300,000 in research grants to support molecular imaging research. The grants, supported by SNM's Education and Research Foundation, represent the society's commitment to advancing molecular imaging and therapy by supporting the next generation of researchers.

"SNM's awards and fellowships are integral to supporting promising young researchers working in the field of molecular imaging," said Henry VanBrocklin, Ph.D., president of SNM's Molecular Imaging Center of Excellence and professor of radiology and biomedical imaging at the University of California, San Francisco. "As a society, we have a tradition of creating opportunities for researchers to excel in the field. These new awards will create further opportunities for young scientists to pursue cutting-edge research in the emerging field of molecular imaging."

"As government agencies continue to struggle with flat research budgets, foundation support is more critical than ever," said SNM President Robert W. Atcher, Ph.D., M.B.A., emerging medical technology team leader at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico and UNM/LANL Professor of Pharmacy at the University of New Mexico. "We must invest in and support the work of promising young researchers in order to realize new advances to patient care. These grants will also position these researchers to effectively compete for funding from Federal agencies by providing seed funding to generate preliminary data on cutting-edge molecular imaging work."

This is the first time that SNM has offered awards specifically to support research in the field of molecular imaging. Recipients of the new Molecular Imaging Awards were announced at SNM's 55th Annual Meeting in New Orleans, La.

Jonas Hannestad from Yale University was named the recipient of the $100,000 SNM Molecular Imaging Research Grant for Junior Medical Faculty for a research project using SPECT to study neuroinflammation and depression during treatment of patients with hepatitis C. This grant provides a junior faculty member who has clinical responsibilities with salary support to fund their research.

Peter Dimetri Olcott from Stanford University and Hyo-eun Carrie Bhang from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine were recognized as recipients of the SNM Postdoctoral Molecular Imaging Scholar Program for their work in whole-body clinical PET/MR systems and therapeutic systems for cancer, respectively. These individual $40,000 grants will support research endeavors for the development and integration of molecular imaging approaches into the investigation of the fundamental causes of disease.

Sepideh Shokouhi from Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vania E. Kenanova from the University of California, Los Angeles, are recipients of the SNM Postdoctoral Molecular Imaging Scholar Program, which provides $60,000 for two years of research at institutions with established molecular imaging programs. Their respective research will focus on Alzheimer's disease and the targeted delivery of imaging or therapeutic agents.

"We are truly thrilled to offer these awards and deeply appreciative of the support of the donors who make this ground-breaking research a reality," said VanBrocklin.
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The application deadline for SNM's 2009 Molecular Imaging Grants is December 5, 2008. More information about the awards is available at www.snm.org/grants. The 2009 applications will be available online later this summer.

About SNM--Advancing Molecular Imaging and Therapy

SNM is an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to raising public awareness about what molecular imaging is and how it can help provide patients with the best health care possible. SNM members specialize in molecular imaging, a vital element of today's medical practice that adds an additional dimension to diagnosis, changing the way common and devastating diseases are understood and treated.

SNM's more than 16,000 members set the standard for molecular imaging and nuclear medicine practice by creating guidelines, sharing information through journals and meetings and leading advocacy on key issues that affect molecular imaging and therapy research and practice. For more information, visit www.snm.org.

Society of Nuclear Medicine

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