New round of Environmental Venture Projects from Stanford's Woods Institute

July 14, 2008

Five faculty research teams will receive a total of $781,691 over the next two years for projects designed to solve some of the world's most serious sustainability challenges, from salmon farming in Chile to farmland irrigation in California. The five teams include 22 faculty members representing a broad cross-section of disciplines at Stanford-including history, biology, anthropology, business, engineering and law.

This year's grants were selected from an initial pool of 28 letters of intent submitted to an EVP faculty committee led by Woods Institute senior fellows Chris Field, a professor of biology, and David M. Kennedy, a professor of history.

"Having served on the selection committee for three years, I'd say this was the strongest applicant pool yet," said Kennedy, the Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History. "I was especially gratified to see some compelling projects that have not only excellent science but also robust social science and public policy components-something we have been trying to encourage."

Twenty-nine EVP grants totaling $3.9 million have been awarded since the annual program was established in 2004. The Woods Institute plans to issue a new call for proposals in the autumn quarter of 2008.

"Two considerations distinguish EVP grants from others," added Kennedy, co-director of Stanford's Bill Lane Center for the Study of the North American West. "They are designed to bring together researchers from various disciplines that do not habitually collaborate, and they are intended to put the research teams on the path to devising usable solutions to real-world problems. Most of the successful proposals this year are anchored in specific geographic locales, but the ones we found most impressive were those that held the prospect of identifying solutions that would be applicable beyond the immediate area of interest."

Here are the five projects awarded EVP grants this year:
-end-
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COMMENT:

Chris Field, Department of Biology: cfield@dge.stanford.edu, (650) 462-1047 ext. 201

David M. Kennedy, Department of History: (650) 723-0351, dmk@stanford.edu

RELEVANT WEB URL:

WOODS INSTITUTE FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

http://woods.stanford.edu

Stanford University

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