Nav: Home

Ethnic inequalities in mental health care prompt call for review

July 15, 2013

Individual ethnic groups use psychiatric and mental health services in Scotland very differently, a study suggests.

Researchers have found that there is a significant difference in the rates of hospitalisations for mental health problems according to ethnic group.

The study also revealed that there are widely differing patterns of hospitalisation for mental health problems among non-White groups. It is the first study of its kind to be carried out in Scotland.

Researchers say that psychiatric and mental health services should be reviewed and monitored to ensure all groups have access to the best preventative care and treatment at an early stage.

The authors also say that the findings show that people from some minority ethnic groups may not be using mental health services until they are seriously ill. They found major differences between ethnic groups in the numbers admitted to hospital for serious mental illness.

People from most, but not all, minority groups who needed to go to hospital were significantly more likely to be treated under the mental health act, the researchers also found.

The Edinburgh team say that the findings could be explained by difficulties in diagnosing and treating mental illness among minority groups at an early stage within mental health services.

Researchers also say that the findings could be explained by a lack of awareness among minority groups of the support services available. They add that people from minority ethnic groups may be reluctant to seek medical help in part because of social stigma.

Dr Narinder Bansal, of the University of Edinburgh's Centre for Population Health Sciences, said: "Studying ethnic variations in psychiatric hospital admission enables us to identify and monitor inequalities in mental health care.

"We hope that this study will inform politicians and doctors' decisions about how treatment is best delivered and planned for, to ensure equal access to early care. It is vital that mental health services meet the needs of Scotland's culturally diverse population."

Researchers studied all first-time psychiatric hospital admissions for any psychiatric diagnosis between 2001 and 2008. These include all psychiatric disorders, mood disorders such as depression, and psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia.
-end-
The study, which is published in the journal Ethnicity and Health, was supported by the Chief Scientist Office, NHS Health Scotland and the Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland.

University of Edinburgh

Related Mental Health Problems Articles:

Poor mental and physical health in pregnancy linked to infant sleep problems
Severe and persistent infant sleep problems in the first year are linked to poor maternal mental and physical health during pregnancy, a new study by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute has found.
Is time spent using social media associated with mental health problems among adolescents?
Adolescents who spend more than three hours a day using social media may be at higher risk for mental health problems.
Number of years in NFL, certain positions portend greater risk for cognitive, mental health problems
Study shows link between longer NFL career and higher risk of cognitive, mental health problems.
Tech time not to blame for teens' mental health problems
A new study, published in the journal Clinical Psychological Science, suggests that the time adolescents are spending on their phones and online is not that bad.
Transgender college students four times as likely to experience mental health problems
In the largest mental health survey of gender minority college students, BU researchers Sarah Lipson and Julia Raifman find that transgender, gender-nonconforming, genderqueer, and nonbinary college students face enormous mental health disparities.
More Mental Health Problems News and Mental Health Problems Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...